Amelia B. Edwards Famous Quotes & Sayings

13 Amelia B. Edwards Famous Sayings, Quotes and Quotation.

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Love is of all stimulants the most powerful. It sharpens the wits like danger, and the memory like hatred; it spurs the will like ambition; it intoxicates like wine. Amelia B. Edwards Sayings: Love is of all stimulants the most powerful. It sharpens the wits like danger, and
Of all the trees that have ever been cultivated by man, the genealogical tree is the driest. It is one, we may be sure, that had no place in the garden of Eden. Its root is in the grave; its produce mere Dead Sea fruit ... Amelia B. Edwards Sayings: Of all the trees that have ever been cultivated by man, the genealogical tree is
Between prosperity and adversity there can be little real fellowship. Amelia B. Edwards Sayings: Between prosperity and adversity there can be little real fellowship.
All tradition,' said the Professor, 'is a type of spiritual truth. The superstitions of the East, and the mythologies of the North - the beautiful Fables of old Greece, and the bold investigations of modern science - all tend to elucidate the same principles; all take their root in those promptings and questionings which are innate in the brain and heart of man. Plato believed that the soul was immortal, and born frequently; that it knew all things; and that what we call learning is but the effort which it makes to recall the wisdom of the Past. "For to search and to learn," said the poet-philosopher, "is reminiscence all." At the bottom of every religious theory, however wild and savage, lies a perception - dim perhaps, and distorted, but still a perception - of God and immortality. Amelia B. Edwards Sayings: All tradition,' said the Professor, 'is a type of spiritual truth. The superstitions of the
The camel has his virtues - so much at least must be admitted; but they do not lie upon the surface. Amelia B. Edwards Sayings: The camel has his virtues - so much at least must be admitted; but they
Were I asked to define it, I should reply that archeology is that science which enables us to register and classify our knowledge of the sum of man's achievement in those arts and handicrafts whereby he has, in time past, signalized his passage from barbarism to civilization. Amelia B. Edwards Sayings: Were I asked to define it, I should reply that archeology is that science which
My heart beat violently. My forehead was bathed in a cold perspiration. I asked myself for the first time what it was that I was about to see when this door was opened? What chamber, long closed - what deed of mystery, long forgotten - what family secret, long buried, would be revealed to my eyes? Was it right, after all, that I should pursue this discovery? Ought I not, perhaps, to go back as I had come; tell my husband of the secret upon which I had stumbled; and leave it to him to deal with according to his pleasure? Hesitating thus, I had, even now, more than half a mind to go no farther. It was a struggle between delicacy and curiosity; and I was a mere woman, after all, and curiosity prevailed.
"Come what may," said I aloud, "I will see what lies beyond this door!"
And with this I opened it.
Amelia B. Edwards Sayings: My heart beat violently. My forehead was bathed in a cold perspiration. I asked myself
It has been aptly said that all Egypt is but the facade of an immense sepulcher. Amelia B. Edwards Sayings: It has been aptly said that all Egypt is but the facade of an immense
The world is terribly apt to take people at their own valuation. Amelia B. Edwards Sayings: The world is terribly apt to take people at their own valuation.
Literature is, in fact, the fruit of leisure. Amelia B. Edwards Sayings: Literature is, in fact, the fruit of leisure.
It is so easy to believe in pleasant impossibilities. Amelia B. Edwards Sayings: It is so easy to believe in pleasant impossibilities.
It may be said of some very old places, as of some very old books, that they are destined to be forever new. The nearer we approach them, the more remote they seem: the more we study them, the more we have yet to learn. Time augments rather than diminishes their everlasting novelty; and to our descendants of a thousand years hence it may safely be predicted that they will be even more fascinating than to ourselves. This is true of many ancient lands, but of no place is it. so true as of Egypt. Amelia B. Edwards Sayings: It may be said of some very old places, as of some very old books,
Did you ever feel a creeping,
That awoke you from your sleeping,
That made your pulses flutter and bristled all your hair;
While a horrid stealthy crawling
Prevented you from calling,
And something seemed to tell you that a ghost was coming there?
Amelia B. Edwards Sayings: Did you ever feel a creeping,That awoke you from your sleeping,That made your pulses flutter