David Hume Famous Quotes & Sayings

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100 David Hume Famous Sayings, Quotes and Quotation.

David Hume Sayings: It is possible for the same thing both to be and not to be. It is possible for the same thing both to be and not to be.
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David Hume Sayings: It is evident, from their method of propagation, that a couple of cats, in fifty It is evident, from their method of propagation, that a couple of cats, in fifty years, would stock a whole kingdom; and if that religious veneration were still paid them, it would, in twenty more, not only be easier in Egypt to find a god than a man, which Petronius says was the case in some parts of Italy; but the gods must at last entirely starve the men, and leave themselves neither priests nor votaries remaining.
David Hume Sayings: The corruption of the best things gives rise to the worst. The corruption of the best things gives rise to the worst.
David Hume Sayings: Be a philosopher, but amid all your philosophy be still a man. Be a philosopher, but amid all your philosophy be still a man.
David Hume Sayings: One that has well digested his knowledge both of books and men, has little enjoyment One that has well digested his knowledge both of books and men, has little enjoyment but in the company of a few select companions. He feels too sensibly, how much all the rest of mankind fall short of the notions which he has entertained. And, his affections being thus confined within a narrow circle, no wonder he carries them further than if they were more general and undistinguished. The gaiety and frolic of a bottle companion improves with him into a solid friendship; and the ardours of a youthful appetite become an elegant passion.
David Hume Sayings: I began to entertain a suspicion, that no man in this age was sufficiently qualified I began to entertain a suspicion, that no man in this age was sufficiently qualified for such an undertaking; and that whatever any one should advance on that head would, in all probability, be refuted by further experience, and be rejected by posterity. Such mighty revolutions have happened in human affairs, and so many events have arisen contrary to the expectation of the ancients, that they are sufficient to beget the suspicion of still further changes.
David Hume Sayings: Where am I, or what? From what causes do I derive my existence, and to Where am I, or what? From what causes do I derive my existence, and to what condition shall I return? ... I am confounded with all these questions, and begin to fancy myself in the most deplorable condition imaginable, environed with the deepest darkness, and utterly deprived of the use of every member and faculty.
Most fortunately it happens, that since Reason is incapable of dispelling these clouds, Nature herself suffices to that purpose, and cures me of this philosophical melancholy and delirium, either by relaxing this bent of mind, or by some avocation, and lively impression of my senses, which obliterate all these chimeras. I dine, I play a game of backgammon, I converse, and am merry with my friends. And when, after three or four hours' amusement, I would return to these speculations, they appear so cold, and strained, and ridiculous, that I cannot find in my heart to enter into them any farther.
David Hume Sayings: But where the ideas of morality and decency alter from one age to another, and But where the ideas of morality and decency alter from one age to another, and where vicious manners are described, without being marked with the proper character of blame and disapprobation, this must be allowed to disfigure the poem, and to be a real deformity. I cannot, nor is it proper I should, enter into such sentiments; and however I may excuse the poet, on account of the manners of age, I can never relish the composition.
David Hume Sayings: Almost every one has a predominant inclination, to which his other desires and affections submit, Almost every one has a predominant inclination, to which his other desires and affections submit, and which governs him, though perhaps with some intervals, though the whole course of his life.
David Hume Sayings: The richest genius, like the most fertile soil, when uncultivated, shoots up into the rankest The richest genius, like the most fertile soil, when uncultivated, shoots up into the rankest weeds.
David Hume Sayings: If suicide be supposed a crime, it is only cowardice can impel us to it. If suicide be supposed a crime, it is only cowardice can impel us to it. If it be no crime, both prudence and courage should engage us to rid ourselves at once of existence when it becomes a burden. It is the only way that we can then be useful to society, by setting an example which, if imitated, would preserve every one his chance for happiness in life, and would effectually free him from all danger or misery.
David Hume Sayings: Barbarity, caprice; these qualities, however nominally disguised, we may universally observe from the ruling character Barbarity, caprice; these qualities, however nominally disguised, we may universally observe from the ruling character of the deity in all regular religions.
David Hume Sayings: Never literary attempt was more unfortunate than my Treatise of Human Nature. It fell dead-born Never literary attempt was more unfortunate than my Treatise of Human Nature. It fell dead-born from the press.
David Hume Sayings: In ancient times, bodily strength and dexterity, being of greater use and importance in war, In ancient times, bodily strength and dexterity, being of greater use and importance in war, was also much more esteemed and valued, than at present ... In short, the different ranks of men are, in a great measure, regulated by riches.
David Hume Sayings: Truth is disputable, not human taste. Truth is disputable, not human taste.
David Hume Sayings: What peculiar privilege has this little agitation of the brain which we call thought, that What peculiar privilege has this little agitation of the brain which we call thought, that we must thus make it the model of the whole universe? Our partiality in our own favour does indeed present it on all occasions; but sound philosophy ought carefully to guard against so natural an illusion.
David Hume Sayings: A hundred cabinet-makers in London can work a table or a chair equally well; but A hundred cabinet-makers in London can work a table or a chair equally well; but no one poet can write verses with such spirit and elegance as Mr. Pope.
David Hume Sayings: I do not think a philosopher who would apply himself so earnestly to the explaining I do not think a philosopher who would apply himself so earnestly to the explaining the ultimate principles of the soul, would show himself a great master in the very science of human nature, which he pretends to explain, or very knowing in what is naturally satisfactory to the mind of man.
David Hume Sayings: Mankind are always found prodigal both of blood and treasure in the maintenance of public Mankind are always found prodigal both of blood and treasure in the maintenance of public justice.
David Hume Sayings: Avarice, the spur of industry, is so obstinate a passion, and works its way through Avarice, the spur of industry, is so obstinate a passion, and works its way through so many real dangers and difficulties, that it is not likely to be scared by an imaginary danger, which is so small, that it scarcely admits of calculation. Commerce, therefore, in my opinion, is apt to decay in absolute governments, not because it is there less secure, but because it is less honourable.
David Hume Sayings: Accuracy is, in every case, advantageous to beauty, and just reasoning to delicate sentiment. In Accuracy is, in every case, advantageous to beauty, and just reasoning to delicate sentiment. In vain would we exalt the one by depreciating the other.
David Hume Sayings: If we take in our hand any volume; of divinity or school metaphysics, for instance; If we take in our hand any volume; of divinity or school metaphysics, for instance; let us ask, Does it contain any abstract reasoning concerning quantity or number? No. Does it contain any experimental reasoning concerning matter of fact and existence? No. Commit it then to the flames: for it can contain nothing but sophistry and illusion.
David Hume Sayings: The mention of one apartment in a building naturally introduces an enquiry or discourse concerning The mention of one apartment in a building naturally introduces an enquiry or discourse concerning the others: and if we think ofa wound, we can scarcely forbear reflecting on the pain which follows it.
David Hume Sayings: Mankind are so much the same, in all times and places, that history informs us Mankind are so much the same, in all times and places, that history informs us of nothing new or strange in this particular. Its chief use is only to discover the constant and universal principles of human nature.
David Hume Sayings: If my life be not my own, it were criminal for me to put it If my life be not my own, it were criminal for me to put it in danger, as well as to dispose of it; nor could one man deserve the appellation of hero, whom glory or friendship transports into the greatest dangers, and another merit the reproach of wretch or misereant who puts a period to his life, from the same or like motives.
David Hume Sayings: Time is a perishable commodity. Time is a perishable commodity.
David Hume Sayings: Ll arguments concerning existence are founded on the relation of cause and effect; that our Ll arguments concerning existence are founded on the relation of cause and effect; that our knowledge of that relation is derived entirely from experience; and all our experimental conclusions proceed upon the supposition that the future will be conformable to the past ... Without the influence of custom, we should be entirely ignorant of every matter of fact beyond what is immediately present to the memory and senses.
David Hume Sayings: The identity that we ascribe to things is only a fictitious one, established by the The identity that we ascribe to things is only a fictitious one, established by the mind, not a peculiar nature belonging to what we're talking about.
David Hume Sayings: I am apt, however, to entertain a Suspicion, that the World is still too young I am apt, however, to entertain a Suspicion, that the World is still too young to fix any general stable Truths in Politics, which will remain true to the latest Posterity. We have not as yet had Experience of above three thousand Years; so that not only the Art of Reasoning is still defective in this Science, as well as in all others, but we even want sufficient Materials, upon which we can reason. 'Tis not sufficiently known, what Degrees of Refinement, either in Virtue or Vice, human Nature is susceptible of; nor what may be expected of Mankind from any great Revolution in their Education, Customs, or Principles.
David Hume Sayings: History is the discovering of the principles of human nature. History is the discovering of the principles of human nature.
David Hume Sayings: In this sullen apathy neither true wisdom nor true happiness can be found. In this sullen apathy neither true wisdom nor true happiness can be found.
David Hume Sayings: Hume argued powerfully that human reason is fundamentally similar to that of the other animals, Hume argued powerfully that human reason is fundamentally similar to that of the other animals, founded on instinct rather than quasi-divine insight into things.
David Hume Sayings: Were a man, whom I know to be honest and opulent, and with whom I Were a man, whom I know to be honest and opulent, and with whom I live in intimate friendship, to come into my house, where I am surrounded with my servants, I rest assured, that he is not to stab me before he leaves it, in order to rob me of my silver standish; and I no more suspect this event, than the falling of the house itself which is new, and solidly built and founded.
But he may have been seized with a sudden and unknown frenzy.
So may a sudden earthquake arise, and shake and tumble my house about my ears.
David Hume Sayings: For my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always For my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure. I never can catch myself at any time without a perception, and never can observe any thing but the perception ... . If any one, upon serious and unprejudic'd reflection thinks he has a different notion of himself, I must confess I can reason no longer with him. All I can allow him is, that he may be in the right as well as I, and that we are essentially different in this particular. He may, perhaps, perceive something simple and continu'd, which he calls himself; tho' I am certain there is no such principle in me.
David Hume Sayings: Your corn is ripe today; mine will be so tomorrow. 'Tis profitable for us both, Your corn is ripe today; mine will be so tomorrow. 'Tis profitable for us both, that I should labour with you today, and that you should aid me tomorrow. I have no kindness for you, and know you have as little for me. I will not, therefore, take any pains upon your account; and should I labour with you upon my own account, in expectation of a return, I know I should be disappointed, and that I should in vain depend upon your gratitude. Here then I leave you to labour alone; You treat me in the same manner. The seasons change; and both of us lose our harvests for want of mutual confidence and security.
David Hume Sayings: The idea of God, as meaning an infinitely intelligent, wise and good Being, arises from The idea of God, as meaning an infinitely intelligent, wise and good Being, arises from reflecting on the operations of our own mind, and augmenting, without limit, those qualities of goodness and wisdom.
David Hume Sayings: When men are most sure and arrogant they are commonly most mistaken, giving views to When men are most sure and arrogant they are commonly most mistaken, giving views to passion without that proper deliberation which alone can secure them from the grossest absurdities.
David Hume Sayings: The life of man is of no greater importance to the universe than that of The life of man is of no greater importance to the universe than that of an oyster.
David Hume Sayings: For as to the dispersing of Books, that Circumstance does perhaps as much harm as For as to the dispersing of Books, that Circumstance does perhaps as much harm as good: Since Nonsense flies with greater Celerity, and makes greater Impression than Reason; though indeed no particular species of Nonsense is so durable. But the several Forms of Nonsense never cease succeeding one another; and Men are always under the Dominion of some one or other, though nothing was ever equal in Absurdity and Wickedness to our present Patriotism.
David Hume Sayings: 'Tis certain that a serious attention to the sciences and liberal arts softens and humanizes 'Tis certain that a serious attention to the sciences and liberal arts softens and humanizes the temper, and cherishes those fine emotions in which true virtue and honor consist. It rarely, very rarely happens that a man of taste and learning is not, at least, an honest man, whatever frailties may attend him.
David Hume Sayings: The sceptics assert, though absurdly, that the origin of all religious worship was derived from The sceptics assert, though absurdly, that the origin of all religious worship was derived from the utility of inanimate objects,as the sun and moon, to the support and well-being of mankind.
David Hume Sayings: The victory is not gained by the men at arms, who manage the pike and The victory is not gained by the men at arms, who manage the pike and the sword; but by the trumpeters,
David Hume Sayings: The admirers and followers of the Al Koran insist on the excellent moral precepts interspersed The admirers and followers of the Al Koran insist on the excellent moral precepts interspersed throughout that wild and absurd performance ... Would we know, whether the pretended prophet had really attained a just sentiment of morality, let us attend to his narration, and we shall soon find, that he bestows praise upon such instances of treachery, inhumanity, cruelty, revenge, bigotry, as are utterly incompatible with civilised society. No steady rule of right conduct seems there to be attended to: and every action is blamed or praised, so far only as it is beneficial or harmful to the true believers.
David Hume Sayings: Between married persons, the cement of friendship is by the laws supposed so strong as Between married persons, the cement of friendship is by the laws supposed so strong as to abolish all division of possessions: andhas often, in reality, the force ascribed to it.
David Hume Sayings: Happy the man whom indulgent fortune allows to pay to virtue what he owes to Happy the man whom indulgent fortune allows to pay to virtue what he owes to nature, and to make a generous gift of what must otherwise be ravished from him by cruel necessity.
David Hume Sayings: Every disastrous accident alarms us, and sets us on enquiries concerning the principles whence it Every disastrous accident alarms us, and sets us on enquiries concerning the principles whence it arose: Apprehensions spring up with regard to futurity: And the mind, sunk into diffidence, terror, and melancholy, has recourse to every method of appeasing those secret intelligent powers, on whom our fortune is supposed entirely to depend.
David Hume Sayings: Battles, revolutions, pestilence, famine, and death, are never the effect of those natural causes, which Battles, revolutions, pestilence, famine, and death, are never the effect of those natural causes, which we experience. Prodigies,omens, oracles, judgments, quite obscure the few natural events, that are intermingled with them. But as the former grow thinner every pagewe soon learn, that there is nothing mysterious or supernatural in the case, but that all proceeds from the usual propensity of mankind towards the marvellous, and that, though this inclination may at intervals receive a check from sense and learning, it can never be thoroughly extirpated.
David Hume Sayings: Beauty in things exists in the mind which contemplates them Beauty in things exists in the mind which contemplates them
David Hume Sayings: It is seldom, that liberty of any kind is lost all at once. Slavery has It is seldom, that liberty of any kind is lost all at once. Slavery has so frightful an aspect to men accustomed to freedom, that it must steal upon them by degrees, and must disguise itself in a thousand shapes, in order to be received.
David Hume Sayings: We choose our favourite author as we do our friend, from a conformity of humour We choose our favourite author as we do our friend, from a conformity of humour and disposition. Mirth or passion, sentiment or reflection; whichever of these most predominates in our temper, it gives us a peculiar sympathy with the writer who resembles us.
David Hume Sayings: Tis not unreasonable for me to prefer the destruction of the whole world to the Tis not unreasonable for me to prefer the destruction of the whole world to the scratching of my finger.
David Hume Sayings: [The sceptic] must acknowledge, if he will acknowledge any thing, that all human life must [The sceptic] must acknowledge, if he will acknowledge any thing, that all human life must perish, were his principles to prevail.All discourse, all action would immediately cease, and men remain in a total lethargy, till the necessities of nature, unsatisfied, put an end to their miserable existence.
David Hume Sayings: Nothing can be more real, or concern us more, than our own sentiments of pleasure Nothing can be more real, or concern us more, than our own sentiments of pleasure and uneasiness; and if these be favourable to virtue and unfavourable to vice, no more can be requisite to the regulation of our conduct and behavior.
David Hume Sayings: Custom, then, is the great guide of human life. It is that principle alone which Custom, then, is the great guide of human life. It is that principle alone which renders our experience useful to us, and makes us expect, for the future, a similar train of events with those which have appeared in the past. Without the influence of custom, we should be entirely ignorant of every matter of fact beyond what is immediately present to the memory and senses. We should never know how to adjust means to ends, or to employ our natural powers in the production of any effect. There would be an end at once of all action, as well as of the chief part of speculation.
David Hume Sayings: The ages of greatest public spirit are not always eminent for private virtue. The ages of greatest public spirit are not always eminent for private virtue.
David Hume Sayings: That a rule, which, in speculation, may seem the most advantageous to society, may yet That a rule, which, in speculation, may seem the most advantageous to society, may yet be found, in practice, totally pernicious and destructive.
David Hume Sayings: A man who has cured himself of all ridiculous prepossessions, and is fully, sincerely, and A man who has cured himself of all ridiculous prepossessions, and is fully, sincerely, and steadily convinced, from experience as well as philosophy, that the difference of fortune makes less difference in happiness than is vulgarly imagined; such a one does not measure out degrees of esteem according to the rent-rolls of his acquaintance. He may, indeed, externally pay a superior deference to the great lord above the vassal; because riches are the most convenient, being the most fixed and determinate, source of distinction. But his internal sentiments are more regulated by the personal characters of men, than by the accidental and capricious favours of fortune.
David Hume Sayings: Habit may lead us to belief and expectation but not to the knowledge, and still Habit may lead us to belief and expectation but not to the knowledge, and still less to the understanding, of lawful relations.
David Hume Sayings: This avidity alone, of acquiring goods and possessions for ourselves and our nearest friends, is This avidity alone, of acquiring goods and possessions for ourselves and our nearest friends, is insatiable, perpetual, universal, and directly destructive of society.
David Hume Sayings: Scholastic learning and polemical divinity retarded the growth of all true knowledge. Scholastic learning and polemical divinity retarded the growth of all true knowledge.
David Hume Sayings: There is no craving or demand of the human mind more constant and insatiable than There is no craving or demand of the human mind more constant and insatiable than that for exercise and employment, and this desire seems the foundation of most of our passions and pursuits.
David Hume Sayings: All sentiment is right; because sentiment has a reference to nothing beyond itself, and is All sentiment is right; because sentiment has a reference to nothing beyond itself, and is always real, wherever a man is conscious of it. But all determinations of the understanding are not right; because they have a reference to something beyond themselves, to wit, real matter of fact; and are not always conformable to that standard.
David Hume Sayings: I shall venture to affirm, that there never was a popular religion, which represented the I shall venture to affirm, that there never was a popular religion, which represented the state of departed souls in such a light,as would render it eligible for human kind, that there should be such a state. These fine models of religion are the mere product of philosophy. For as death lies between the eye and the prospect of futurity, that event is so shocking to nature, that it must throw a gloom on all the regions which lie beyond it; and suggest to the generality of mankind the idea of Cerberus and Furies; devils, and torrents of fire and brimstone.
David Hume Sayings: The supposition that the future resembles the past, is not founded on arguments of any The supposition that the future resembles the past, is not founded on arguments of any kind, but is derived entirely from habit.
David Hume Sayings: When anyone tells me that he saw a dead man restored to life, I immediately When anyone tells me that he saw a dead man restored to life, I immediately consider with myself whether it be more probable that this person should either deceive or be deceived or that the fact which he relates should really have happened. I weigh the one miracle against the other and according to the superiority which I discover, I pronounce my decision. Always I reject the greater miracle. If the falsehood of his testimony would be more miraculous than the event which he relates, then and not till then, can he pretend to command my belief or opinion.
David Hume Sayings: Enthusiasm, being the infirmity of bold and ambitious tempers, is naturally accompanied with a spirit Enthusiasm, being the infirmity of bold and ambitious tempers, is naturally accompanied with a spirit of liberty; as superstition,on the contrary, renders men tame and abject, and fits them for slavery.
David Hume Sayings: It is a certain rule that wit and passion are entirely incompatible. When the affections It is a certain rule that wit and passion are entirely incompatible. When the affections are moved, there is no place for the imagination.
David Hume Sayings: A man posing for a painting. A man posing for a painting.
David Hume Sayings: The stability of modern governments above the ancient, and the accuracy of modern philosophy, have The stability of modern governments above the ancient, and the accuracy of modern philosophy, have improved, and probably will still improve, by similar gradations.
David Hume Sayings: All this creative power of the mind amounts to no more than the faculty of All this creative power of the mind amounts to no more than the faculty of compounding, transposing, augmenting, or diminishing the materials afforded us the by senses and experience.
David Hume Sayings: Enthusiasm produces the most cruel disorders in human society; but its fury is like that Enthusiasm produces the most cruel disorders in human society; but its fury is like that of thunder and tempest, which exhaust themselves in a little time, and leave the air more calm and serene than before.
David Hume Sayings: It is harder to avoid censure than to gain applause; for this may be done It is harder to avoid censure than to gain applause; for this may be done by one great or wise action in an age. But to escape censure a man must pass his whole life without saying or doing one ill or foolish thing
David Hume Sayings: It is indeed a mortifying reflection to those who are actuated by the love of It is indeed a mortifying reflection to those who are actuated by the love of fame, so justly denominated the last infirmity of noble minds, that the wisest legislator and most exalted genius that ever reformed or enlightened the world can never expect such tributes of praise as are lavished on the memory of pretended saints, whose whole conduct was probably to the last degree odious or contemptible, and whose industry was entirely directed to the pursuit of objects pernicious to mankind. It is only a conqueror, a personage no less entitled to our hatred, who can pretend to the attainment of equal renown and glory.
David Hume Sayings: It is on opinion only that government is founded; and this maxim extends to the It is on opinion only that government is founded; and this maxim extends to the most despotic and most military governments, as well as to the most free and most popular.
David Hume Sayings: What we call a mind is nothing but a heap or collection of different perceptions, What we call a mind is nothing but a heap or collection of different perceptions, united together by certain relations and supposed, though falsely, to be endowed with a perfect simplicity and identity.
David Hume Sayings: Courage, of all national qualities, is the most precarious; because it is exerted only at Courage, of all national qualities, is the most precarious; because it is exerted only at intervals, and by a few in every nation; whereas industry, knowledge, civility, may be of constant and universal use, and for several ages, may become habitual to the whole people.
David Hume Sayings: Apart from the representational content of an idea there is another component: its force and Apart from the representational content of an idea there is another component: its force and vivacity, its impetus.
David Hume Sayings: I am ready to reject all belief and reasoning, and can look upon no opinion I am ready to reject all belief and reasoning, and can look upon no opinion even as more probable or likely than another.
David Hume Sayings: [I]f subjects must never resist, it follows that every prince, without any effort, policy, or [I]f subjects must never resist, it follows that every prince, without any effort, policy, or violence, is at once rendered absolute and uncontrollable;
David Hume Sayings: Nothing is more dangerous to reason than the flights of the imagination and nothing has Nothing is more dangerous to reason than the flights of the imagination and nothing has been the occasion of more mistakes among philosophers.
David Hume Sayings: There is not to be found, in all history, any miracle attested by a sufficient There is not to be found, in all history, any miracle attested by a sufficient number of men, of such unquestioned good sense, education and learning, as to secure us against all delusion in themselves.
David Hume Sayings: Justice is a moral virtue, merely because it has that tendency to the good of Justice is a moral virtue, merely because it has that tendency to the good of mankind, and indeed is nothing but an artificial invention to that purpose. The same may be said of allegiance, of the laws of nations, of modesty, and of good manners. All these are mere human contrivances for the interest of society.
David Hume Sayings: There is only one vice, which may be found in life with as strong features, There is only one vice, which may be found in life with as strong features, and as high a colouring as needs be employed by any satyrist or comic poet; and that is AVARICE.
David Hume Sayings: Truth is disputable; not taste: what exists in the nature of things is the standard Truth is disputable; not taste: what exists in the nature of things is the standard of our judgement; what each man feels within himself is the standard of sentiment. Propositions in geometry may be proved, systems in physics may be controverted; but the harmony of verse, the tenderness of passion, the brilliancy of wit, must give immediate pleasure. No man reasons concerning another's beauty; but frequently concerning the justice or injustice of his actions.
David Hume Sayings: Eloquence, at its highest pitch, leaves little room for reason or reflection, but addresses itself Eloquence, at its highest pitch, leaves little room for reason or reflection, but addresses itself entirely to the desires and affections, captivating the willing hearers, and subduing their understanding.
David Hume Sayings: This world, for aught he knows, is very faulty and imperfect, compared to a superior This world, for aught he knows, is very faulty and imperfect, compared to a superior standard; and was only the first rude essay of some infant deity, who afterwards abandoned it, ashamed of his lame performance: it is the work only of some dependent, inferior deity; and is the object of derision to his superiors: it is the production of old age and dotage in some superannuated
deity; and ever since his death, has run on at adventures, from the first impulse and active force which it received from him.
David Hume Sayings: A delicacy of taste is favorable to love and friendship, by confining our choice to A delicacy of taste is favorable to love and friendship, by confining our choice to few people, and making us indifferent to the company and conversation of the greater part of men.
David Hume Sayings: The mind is a kind of theater, where several perceptions successively make their appearence; pass, The mind is a kind of theater, where several perceptions successively make their appearence; pass, re-pass, glide away, and mingle in an infinite variety of postures and situations.
David Hume Sayings: Convulsions in nature, disorders, prodigies, miracles, though the most opposite of the plan of a Convulsions in nature, disorders, prodigies, miracles, though the most opposite of the plan of a wise superintendent, impress mankind with the strongest sentiments of religion.
David Hume Sayings: That I am ready to throw all of my books and papers into the fire, That I am ready to throw all of my books and papers into the fire, and resolve never more to renounce the pleasure of life for the sake of reasoning and philosophy.
David Hume Sayings: Character is the result of a system of stereotyped principals. Character is the result of a system of stereotyped principals.
David Hume Sayings: No advantages in this world are pure and unmixed. No advantages in this world are pure and unmixed.
David Hume Sayings: [priests are] the pretenders to power and dominion, and to a superior sanctity of character, [priests are] the pretenders to power and dominion, and to a superior sanctity of character, distinct from virtue and good morals.
David Hume Sayings: Human happiness seems to consist in three ingredients; action, pleasure and indolence. And though these Human happiness seems to consist in three ingredients; action, pleasure and indolence. And though these ingredients ought to be mixed in different proportions, according to the disposition of the person, yet no one ingredient can be entirely wanting without destroying in some measure the relish of the whole composition.
David Hume Sayings: A little philosophy makes a man an Atheist: a great deal converts him to religion A little philosophy makes a man an Atheist: a great deal converts him to religion
David Hume Sayings: I may venture to affirm the rest of mankind, that they are nothing but a I may venture to affirm the rest of mankind, that they are nothing but a bundle or collection of different perceptions, which succeed each other with an inconceivable rapidity, and are in a perpetual flux and movement.
David Hume Sayings: Vanity is so closely allied to virtue, and to love the fame of laudable actions Vanity is so closely allied to virtue, and to love the fame of laudable actions approaches so near the love of laudable actions for their own sake, that these passions are more capable of mixture than any other kinds of affection; and it is almost impossible to have the latter without some degree of the former.
David Hume Sayings: Uncommon expressions are a disfigurement rather than an embellishment of discourse. Uncommon expressions are a disfigurement rather than an embellishment of discourse.
David Hume Sayings: And indeed nothing but the most determined scepticism, along with a great degree of indolence, And indeed nothing but the most determined scepticism, along with a great degree of indolence, can justify this aversion to metaphysics. For if truth be at all within the reach of human capacity, it is certain it must lie very deep and abstruse: and to hope we shall arrive at it without pains, while the greatest geniuses have failed with the utmost pains, must certainly be esteemed sufficiently vain and presumptuous. I pretend to no such advantage in the philosophy I am going to unfold, and would esteem it a strong presumption against it, were it so very easy and obvious.
David Hume Sayings: All ills spring from some vice, either in ourselves or others; and even many of All ills spring from some vice, either in ourselves or others; and even many of our diseases proceed from the same origin. Remove the vices; and the ills follow. You must only take care to remove all the vices. If you remove part, you may render the matter worse. By banishing vicious luxury, without curing sloth and an indifference to others, you only diminish industry in the state, and add nothing to men's charity or their generosity.