John Walford Famous Quotes & Sayings

17 John Walford Famous Sayings, Quotes and Quotation.

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google+ Pinterest Share on Linkedin

As far as stimulus from the visual arts specifically, there is today in most of us a visual appetite that is hungry, that is acutely undernourished. One might go so far as to say that Protestants in particular suffer from a form of visual anorexia. It is not that there is a lack of visual stimuli, but rather a lack of wholesomeness of form and content amidst the all-pervasive sensory overload. John Walford Sayings: As far as stimulus from the visual arts specifically, there is today in most of
Advertizing, television and film all wield mighty powers to visually seduce us, while much fine art leaves us indifferent, confused or, at worst, repulsed. There is a desperate need for creative Christians to redeem the visual arena from both forms of excess, cutting through all the false glamour, tawdry baseness and dense obfuscation. John Walford Sayings: Advertizing, television and film all wield mighty powers to visually seduce us, while much fine
Beauty, therefore, for the modern and postmodern artist has become a highly dubious metaphor for a discredited belief system. John Walford Sayings: Beauty, therefore, for the modern and postmodern artist has become a highly dubious metaphor for
In as much as Christ's mission was to bring all things into submission to God, and to restore not only humanity, but also the whole creation to its proper purposes, to make straight what is crooked, and to redeem both humanity and the creation from the curse of sin, then herein can be found the possibility for a full and wholesome realization of human artistic activity. John Walford Sayings: In as much as Christ's mission was to bring all things into submission to God,
In the Classical tradition, deriving from ancient Greece and Rome, beauty was perceived as the means by which the artist captured the viewer's eye in order to engage the viewer with truth and so inspire goodness. John Walford Sayings: In the Classical tradition, deriving from ancient Greece and Rome, beauty was perceived as the
Begbie offers an additional valuable contribution by rejecting the traditional emphasis on beauty, in its Platonic sense, and instead suggesting that beauty be reconceived in Christological terms-as disorder redeemed. John Walford Sayings: Begbie offers an additional valuable contribution by rejecting the traditional emphasis on beauty, in its
Redemption in Christ should give the artistically gifted not only a new orientation and a new sense of purpose, but also a new vision of reality, seeing the world through the eyes of faith, looking at the human condition through the eyes of Christ. John Walford Sayings: Redemption in Christ should give the artistically gifted not only a new orientation and a
Beyond the pervasive disinterest in the visual arts among the Protestant community, the core problem lies in the fact that the art world rejects on several grounds work that is in any way explicitly Christian in content and also shrugs off as naive anything that has the semblance of hope or optimism in outlook. John Walford Sayings: Beyond the pervasive disinterest in the visual arts among the Protestant community, the core problem
In this same tradition, beauty is inextricably bound up with the principles of order and harmony believed to underlie the cosmos. Artists in the Classical tradition, inspired by Platonic idealism, strove to create images that represented not the world of particulars-with all its defects-but an ideal image conceived in the mind, which was taken as representing some absolute, pure, ideal form of which all particular, material forms are but a mere shadow. John Walford Sayings: In this same tradition, beauty is inextricably bound up with the principles of order and
Who is one's audience, the spiritually hostile professional art world or one's visually insensitive Christian neighbour? John Walford Sayings: Who is one's audience, the spiritually hostile professional art world or one's visually insensitive Christian
The cumulative effect of the Romantic theory of creativity, as played out in the context of belief in the virtue of the avant-garde, is that while the art world has effectively freed itself from the tyranny of artistic tradition and its historic patronage system, it has ended up inhabiting an autonomous but perceived irrelevance. John Walford Sayings: The cumulative effect of the Romantic theory of creativity, as played out in the context
Beyond a narrow, elite audience, there is a pervasive sense from the side of the public that much contemporary art fails to connect - a failure not evident throughout centuries of earlier art. John Walford Sayings: Beyond a narrow, elite audience, there is a pervasive sense from the side of the
Christ, as the ultimate Imago Dei is alluded to in scripture as being without external beauty in the Classical sense, and should better be thought of as one who passed through all the slime and mire of a fallen and sinful creation in order to redeem it. His own body is to be remembered for the marks it bears-even in resurrection-of the scars of his sacrificial death. For the Christian, a theory of beauty might better begin at this point. John Walford Sayings: Christ, as the ultimate Imago Dei is alluded to in scripture as being without external
It would be a serious oversight to limit our understanding of the impact of theology to strictly religious art, and overlook its pervasive role in shaping human understanding and artistic expression thereof within any given culture-regardless of the subject matter at hand. John Walford Sayings: It would be a serious oversight to limit our understanding of the impact of theology
Postmodernism has not overcome the problems of modernism, but only compounded them with a dosis of cynicism, relativism and indifference. John Walford Sayings: Postmodernism has not overcome the problems of modernism, but only compounded them with a dosis
Narcissism and Christianity have little in common, yet the Romantic paradigm of artistic creativity, particularly in light of subsequent Freudian ideas, has tended to foster its share of narcissism. It was the tragic fate of Narcissus that he was so preoccupied with self that he could not appreciate God, nature, or the other. John Walford Sayings: Narcissism and Christianity have little in common, yet the Romantic paradigm of artistic creativity, particularly
Put crudely, one is left with a choice between two unsatisfactory combinations: artistic integrity married to spiritual compromise; and spiritual integrity married to artistic banality-or, worse, art compromised on both counts. Neither one will satisfy those who recognize the fundamental necessity of integrity in both faith and art. John Walford Sayings: Put crudely, one is left with a choice between two unsatisfactory combinations: artistic integrity married