Lord Dunsany Famous Quotes & Sayings

73 Lord Dunsany Famous Sayings, Quotes and Quotation.

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Of pure poetry there are two kinds, that which mirrors the beauty of the world in which our bodies are, and that which builds the more mysterious kingdoms where geography ends and fairyland begins, with gods and heroes at war, and the sirens singing still, and Alph going down to the darkness from Xanadu. Lord Dunsany Sayings: Of pure poetry there are two kinds, that which mirrors the beauty of the world
Ivy dreams sullenly and alone of overthrowing the cities. Lord Dunsany Sayings: Ivy dreams sullenly and alone of overthrowing the cities.
He did not seem like a fallen angel now. His spell had stopped. He seemed like a professor who had forgotten the theme of his lecture, while the class waits.
For Morano was holding up the sign of the cross.
"You have betrayed me!" shouted the Slave of Orion.
"Master," Morano said, "it was always good against magic.
Lord Dunsany Sayings: He did not seem like a fallen angel now. His spell had stopped. He seemed
She gave thanks to the images of the stars for the joy she had had of the night, when the constellations shone in their myriad majesty, and moved like an army dresses in silver mail, marching from unknown victories to conquer in distant wars. She praised those bright reflections shimmering down in the pool. Lord Dunsany Sayings: She gave thanks to the images of the stars for the joy she had had
And little he knew of the things that ink may do, how it can mark a dead man's thought for the wonder of later years, and tell of happening that are gone clean away, and be a voice for us out of the dark of time, and save many a fragile thing from the pounding of heavy ages; or carry to us, over the rolling centuries, even a song from lips long dead on forgotten hills. Lord Dunsany Sayings: And little he knew of the things that ink may do, how it can mark
Yet in the blood of man there is a tide, an old sea-current rather, that is somehow akin to the twilight, which brings him rumours of beauty from however far away, as driftwood is found at sea from islands not yet discovered: and this spring-tide or current that visits the blood of man comes from the fabulous quarter of his lineage, from the legendary, the old; it takes him out to the woodlands, out to the hills; he listens to ancient song. Lord Dunsany Sayings: Yet in the blood of man there is a tide, an old sea-current rather, that
grave monsters of fable in deeps of the ferny forest danced minuets that witches had made of their whims and their laughter, long ago long ago in their youth before cities had come to the world. And the trees of the forest heavily lifted slow roots out of the ground and swayed upon them uncouthly and then danced as on monstrous claws, and the insects danced on the huge waving leaves. And in the dark of long caverns weird things in enchanted seclusion rose out of their age-long sleep and danced in the damp Lord Dunsany Sayings: grave monsters of fable in deeps of the ferny forest danced minuets that witches had
But I called, as we came near, to one who stood beside the water's edge, asking him what men did in Astahahn and what their merchandise was, and with whom they traded. He said, "Here we have fettered and manacled Time, who would otherwise slay the gods." I asked him what gods they worshipped in that city, and he said, "All those gods whom Time has not yet slain." (from "Idle Days on the River Yann") Lord Dunsany Sayings: But I called, as we came near, to one who stood beside the water's edge,
It is very seldom that the same man knows much of science, and about the things that were known before science came. Lord Dunsany Sayings: It is very seldom that the same man knows much of science, and about the
Come with me, ladies and gentlemen who are in any wise weary of London: come with me: and those that tire at all of the world we know: for we have new worlds here. Lord Dunsany Sayings: Come with me, ladies and gentlemen who are in any wise weary of London: come
It was the hour when gauze-winged insects are born that only live for a day. Lord Dunsany Sayings: It was the hour when gauze-winged insects are born that only live for a day.
Rodriguez, in addition to the pleasant glow in the mind that comes from a generous action, had another feeling that gives all of us pleasure, a feeling of increased safety; for while he had the ring upon his finger and Morano went unpaid the thought could not help occurring, even to a generous mind, that one of these windy nights Morano might come for his wages. Lord Dunsany Sayings: Rodriguez, in addition to the pleasant glow in the mind that comes from a generous
Then I perceived, what I had never thought, that all these staring houses were not alike, but different one from another, because they held different dreams. Lord Dunsany Sayings: Then I perceived, what I had never thought, that all these staring houses were not
Then said Fate to Chance: "Let us play our old game again." And they played it again together, using the gods as pieces, as they had played it oft before. So that those things which have been shall all be again, and under the same bank in the same land a sudden glare of singlight on the same spring day shall bring the same daffodil to bloom once more and the same child shall pick it, and not regretted shall be the billion years that fell between. And the same old faces shall be seen again, yet not bereaved of their familiar haunts. And you and I shall in a garden meet again upon an afternoon in summer when the sun stands midway between his zenith and the sea, where we met oft before. For Fate and Chance play but one game together with every move the same, and they play it oft to while eternity away. Lord Dunsany Sayings: Then said Fate to Chance: "Let us play our old game again." And they played
Rodriguez seldom concerned himself with the past, holding that the future is all we can order the scheme of.
And maybe even here he was wrong.
Lord Dunsany Sayings: Rodriguez seldom concerned himself with the past, holding that the future is all we can
How beautiful are dreams! In dreams the dead may live, even the long dead and the very silent. Lord Dunsany Sayings: How beautiful are dreams! In dreams the dead may live, even the long dead and
And there, with their gables lifting into the sunlight above deep hedgerows beautiful with spring. He saw the cottages of earthly men. Past them he walked while the beauty of evening grew, with songs of birds, and scents wandering from flowers, and odours that deepened, and evening decked herself to receive the Evening Star. Lord Dunsany Sayings: And there, with their gables lifting into the sunlight above deep hedgerows beautiful with spring.
Everyone's future is, in reality, uncertain and full of unknown treasures from which all may draw unguessed prizes. Lord Dunsany Sayings: Everyone's future is, in reality, uncertain and full of unknown treasures from which all may
It has always struck me that one of the readiest ways of estimating a country's regard for law is to notice what arms the officers of the law are carrying: in England it is little batons, in France swords, in many countries revolvers, and in Russia the police used to have artillery. Lord Dunsany Sayings: It has always struck me that one of the readiest ways of estimating a country's
The years are going by us like huge birds, whom Doom and Destiny and the schemes of God have frightened up out of some old gray marsh. Lord Dunsany Sayings: The years are going by us like huge birds, whom Doom and Destiny and the
Contrast is the dramatist's method. Lord Dunsany Sayings: Contrast is the dramatist's method.
Winter descended on Erl and gripped the forest, holding the small twigs stiff and still: in the valley it silenced the stream; and in the fields of the oxen the grass was brittle as earthenware, and the breath of the beasts went up like the smoke of encampments. And Orion still went to the woods whenever Oth would take him, and sometimes he went with Threl. When he went with Oth the wood was full of the glamour of the beasts that Oth hunted, and the splendour of the great stags seemed to haunt the gloom of far hollows; but when he went with Threl a mystery haunted the wood, so that one could not say what creature might not appear, nor what haunted and hid by every enormous bole. What beasts there were in the wood even Threl did not know: many kinds fell to his subtlety, but who knew if these were all? Lord Dunsany Sayings: Winter descended on Erl and gripped the forest, holding the small twigs stiff and still:
There seemed to be a magic all round that fire of big logs quietly smouldering in the woods upon Autumn's discarded robe that lay brilliant there; and it was not the magic of Elfland, nor had Ziroonderel called it up with her wand: it was only a magic of the wood's very own. And Lord Dunsany Sayings: There seemed to be a magic all round that fire of big logs quietly smouldering
All the wild ways he had shown me, mosses and rushes and heather, the home of the curlew and snipe, and the grazing grounds of the geese, all those enchanted fields and the magical willows lying under the edge of the bog, all were to be spoiled, hidden, sold and disenchanted by that terrible force named Progress. Lord Dunsany Sayings: All the wild ways he had shown me, mosses and rushes and heather, the home
And indeed he had no sooner come to the field than he saw all the toadstools leaning over one way, and that the way he was going; for just as thorn trees all lean away from the sea, so toadstools and every plant that has any touch of mystery, such as foxgloves, mulleins and certain kinds of orchis, when growing anywhere near it, all lean towards Elfland. By this one may know before one has heard a murmur of waves, or before one has guessed an influence of magical things, that one comes, as the case may be, to the sea or the border of Elfland. Lord Dunsany Sayings: And indeed he had no sooner come to the field than he saw all the
They were like some popular cry, some vehement fancy, that comes down on a page of history for a day, and passes, leaving no other record at all except those lines on one page. And Lord Dunsany Sayings: They were like some popular cry, some vehement fancy, that comes down on a page
Alderic, Knight of the Order of the City and the Assault, hereditary Guardian of the King's Peace of Mind, a man not unremembered among the makers of myth, pondered so long upon the Gibbelins' hoard that by now he deemed it his. Alas that I should say of so perilous a venture, undertaken at dead of night by a valorous man, that its motive was sheer avarice! Yet upon avarice only the Gibbelins relied to keep their larders full, and once in every hundred years sent spies into the cities of men to see how avarice did, and always the spies returned again to the tower saying that all was well.
It may be thought that, as the years went on and men came by fearful ends on that tower's wall, fewer and fewer would come to the Gibbelins' table: but the Gibbelins found otherwise.
("The Hoard Of The Gibbelins")
Lord Dunsany Sayings: Alderic, Knight of the Order of the City and the Assault, hereditary Guardian of the
And you that sought for magic in your youth but desire it not in your age, know that there is a blindness of spirit which comes from age, more black than the blindness of eye, making a darkness about you across which nothing may be seen, or felt, or known, or in any way apprehended. Lord Dunsany Sayings: And you that sought for magic in your youth but desire it not in your
The Gibbelins eat, as is well known, nothing less good than man. Lord Dunsany Sayings: The Gibbelins eat, as is well known, nothing less good than man.
And at that moment a wind came out of the northwest, and entered the woods and bared the golden branches, and danced over the downs, and led a company of scarlet and golden leaves, that had dreaded this day but danced now it had come; and away with a riot of dancing and glory of colour, high in the light of the sun that had set from the sight of the fields, went wind and leaves together. Lord Dunsany Sayings: And at that moment a wind came out of the northwest, and entered the woods
They came as quietly as rain, and went away like mists drifting. There were jests about them and songs. And the songs outlasted the jests. At last they became a legend, which haunted those farms for ever: they were spoken of when men told of hopeless quests, and held up to laughter or glory, whichever men had to give. And Lord Dunsany Sayings: They came as quietly as rain, and went away like mists drifting. There were jests
There is indeed a great deal of futility amongst the human race which we do not commonly see, for it all forms part of our illusion; but let a man be much annoyed by something that others do, so that he is separated from them and has to leave them, and looks back at what they are doing, and he'll see at once all manner of whimsical absurdities that he had not noticed before; and Ramon Alonzo in the shade of his oak, waiting for the noon to go by, grew very contemptuous of the attitude that the world took up towards shadows. Lord Dunsany Sayings: There is indeed a great deal of futility amongst the human race which we do
And she would not hold back his limbs when his heart was gone to the woods, for it is ever the way of witches with any two things to care for the more mysterious of the two. Lord Dunsany Sayings: And she would not hold back his limbs when his heart was gone to the
Her feet half rested half floated, upon the floor; Earth scarcely held her down, so fast was she becoming a thing of dreams. No love of hers for Earth, or of the children of Earth for her, had any longer power to hold her there. And Lord Dunsany Sayings: Her feet half rested half floated, upon the floor; Earth scarcely held her down, so
Hooded, and veiled with their night-like tresses, The Fates shall bring what no prophet guesses." And Lord Dunsany Sayings: Hooded, and veiled with their night-like tresses, The Fates shall bring what no prophet guesses."
For he had acquired a lore in his youth which taught him ever to avoid the aged when merry plans were afoot; for the aged would come with their wisdom and slowness of thought, and other plans would be made, and there would be, at least, delay. Lord Dunsany Sayings: For he had acquired a lore in his youth which taught him ever to avoid
Nothing is unobtainable to the sword. Lord Dunsany Sayings: Nothing is unobtainable to the sword.
There is no beauty or romance or mystery in the sea except for the men that sail abroad upon it, and those who stay at home and dream of them. Lord Dunsany Sayings: There is no beauty or romance or mystery in the sea except for the men
Now there was great rejoicing at the rumor of Alderic's quest, for all folk knew that he was a cautious man, and they deemed that he would succeed and enrich the world, and they rubbed their hands in the cities at the thought of largesse; and there was joy among all men in Alderic's country, except perchance among the lenders of money, who feared they would soon be paid. And there was rejoicing also because men hoped that when the Gibbelins were robbed of their hoard, they would shatter their high-built bridge and break the golden chains that bound them to the world, and drift back, they and their tower, to the moon, from which they had come and to which they rightly belonged. There was little love for the Gibbelins, though all men envied their hoard.
("The Hoard Of The Gibbelins")
Lord Dunsany Sayings: Now there was great rejoicing at the rumor of Alderic's quest, for all folk knew
How would some townsman feel who loved his city, and knew that a band of farmers with their ploughs threatened his very pavements and would tear his high buildings down? As he would feel, fearing that turnips would thrive where his busses ran, so I felt and feared for Lisronagh. Lord Dunsany Sayings: How would some townsman feel who loved his city, and knew that a band of
O gods, rob not the earth of the dim hush that hangs round all Your temples, bereave not all the world of old romance, take not the glamour from the moonlight nor tear the wonder out of the white mists in every land; for, O ye gods of the childhood of the world, when You have left the earth You shall have taken the mystery from the sea and all its glory from antiquity, and You shall have wrenched our hope from the dim future. There shall be no strange cities at night time half understood, nor songs in the twilight, and the whole of the wonder shall have died with last year's flowers in little gardens or hill-slopes leaning south; for with the gods must go the enchantment of the plains and all the magic of dark woods, and something shall be lacking from the quiet of early dawn. Lord Dunsany Sayings: O gods, rob not the earth of the dim hush that hangs round all Your
What could she do who would not cast away magic and leave the home that an ageless day had endeared to her while centuries were withering like leaves upon earthly shores, whose heart was yet held by those little tendrils of Earth, which are strong enough, strong enough? Lord Dunsany Sayings: What could she do who would not cast away magic and leave the home that
There are many men like this; they can form a plausible theory and grasp its logical points, but take it away from them and destroy it utterly before their eyes, and they will not so easily lash their tired brains at once to build another theory in place of the one that is ruined. Lord Dunsany Sayings: There are many men like this; they can form a plausible theory and grasp its
And all her unsaid thanks so burned in her heart that all of a sudden she rose and left her tower and went out to the open starlight, and lifted her face to the stars and the place of Orion, and stood all dumb though her thanks were trembling upon her lips; for Alveric had told her one must not pray to the stars. With face upturned to all that wandering host she stood long silent, obedient to Alveric: then she lowered her eyes, and there was a small pool glimmering in the night, in which all the faces of the stars were shining. "To pray to the stars," she said to herself in the night, "is surely wrong. These images in the water are not the stars. I will pray to their images, and the stars will know." And Lord Dunsany Sayings: And all her unsaid thanks so burned in her heart that all of a sudden
Humanity, let us say, is like people packed in an automobile which is traveling downhill without lights at terrific speed and driven by a four-year-old child. The signposts along the way are all marked 'Progress. Lord Dunsany Sayings: Humanity, let us say, is like people packed in an automobile which is traveling downhill
If one who looked from a tower for a new star, watching for years the same part of the sky, suddenly saw it (quite by chance while thinking of other things), and knew it for the star for which he had hoped, how many millions of men would never care? Lord Dunsany Sayings: If one who looked from a tower for a new star, watching for years the
I have lived to see that being seventeen is no protection against becoming seventy, but to know this needs the experience of a lifetime, for no imagination copes with it. Lord Dunsany Sayings: I have lived to see that being seventeen is no protection against becoming seventy, but
Then on the River I saw the dream-built ship of the god Yoharneth-Lehai, whose great prow lifted grey into the air above the River of Silence. Her timbers were olden dreams dreamed long ago, and poets' fancies made her tall, straight masts, and her rigging was wrought out of the people's hopes. Upon her deck were rowers with dream-made oars, and the rowers were the people of men's fancies, and princes of old story and people who had died, and people who had never been. Lord Dunsany Sayings: Then on the River I saw the dream-built ship of the god Yoharneth-Lehai, whose great
Indeed if one had just seen him at the end of the evening with the dusk and the mist of the fenlands close behind him he might have believed that in the dusk and the mist was an army that followed this gay worn confident man.
Had the army been there Niv was sane.
Had the world accepted that an army was there, still he was sane.
But the lonely fancy that had not fact to feed on, nor the fancy of any other for fellowship, was for its loneliness mad.
Lord Dunsany Sayings: Indeed if one had just seen him at the end of the evening with the
It is vey difficult to draw away from the face of God - it is like a warm fire, it is like dear sleep, it is like a great anthem, yet there is a stillness all about it, a stillness full of lights. Lord Dunsany Sayings: It is vey difficult to draw away from the face of God - it is
I should have shouted "No" and left him. "But at least" said Satan in the deeps of my mind, "know what the temptation is before you do anything hastily. Lord Dunsany Sayings: I should have shouted "No" and left him. "But at least" said Satan in the
Now it is thus with time in Elfland: in the eternal beauty that dreams in that honied air nothing stirs or fades or dies, nothing seeks its happiness in movement or change or a new thing, but has its ecstasy in the perpetual contemplation of all the beauty that has ever been, and which always glows over those enchanted lawns as intense as when first created by incantation or song. Lord Dunsany Sayings: Now it is thus with time in Elfland: in the eternal beauty that dreams in
Into that charm and the gloom and the deep silence Oth moved gravely; and a solemness came on his face as he entered the wood; for to go on quiet feet through the wood was the work of his life, and he came to it as men come to their heart's desire. Lord Dunsany Sayings: Into that charm and the gloom and the deep silence Oth moved gravely; and a
Nothing is as certain as a closed mind Lord Dunsany Sayings: Nothing is as certain as a closed mind
A man is a very small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders. Lord Dunsany Sayings: A man is a very small thing, and the night is very large and full
All sound arises out of Silence
and dissolves into Silence.
All thought arises out of Silence
and dissolves into Silence.
The universe arises out of Silence
and dissolves into Silence.
Suffering arises out of Silence
and dissolves into Silence.
The unbounded spaciousness of Silence,
filled with the clear light of Awareness,
dissolves the roots of pain and sorrow.
Take refuge in Silence and know
unshakable joy
Lord Dunsany Sayings: All sound arises out of Silence and dissolves into Silence. All thought arises out of
Bricks without straw are more easily made than imagination without memories. Lord Dunsany Sayings: Bricks without straw are more easily made than imagination without memories.
Fame as she walked at evening in a city saw the painted face of Notoriety flaunting beneath a gas-lamp, and many kneeled unto her in the dirt of the road. "Who are you?" Fame said to her. "I am Fame," said Notoriety. Then Fame stole softly away so that no one knew she had gone. And Notoriety presently went forth and all her worshippers rose and followed after, and she led them, as was most meet, to her native Pit. Lord Dunsany Sayings: Fame as she walked at evening in a city saw the painted face of Notoriety
And Jabim is the Lord of broken things, who sitteth behind the house to lament the things that are cast away. And there he sitteth lamenting the broken things until the worlds be ended, or until someone cometh to mend the broken things. Or sometimes he sitteth by the river's edge to lament the forgotten things that drift upon it.
A kindly god is Jabim, whose heart is sore if anything be lost.
Lord Dunsany Sayings: And Jabim is the Lord of broken things, who sitteth behind the house to lament
For a while, O King, the gods had sought to solve the riddles of Time, for a while They made him Their slave, and Time smiled and obeyed his masters, for a while, O King, for a while. He that hath spared nothing hath not spared the gods, nor yet shall he spare thee. Lord Dunsany Sayings: For a while, O King, the gods had sought to solve the riddles of Time,
The fear of dogs is deep and universal amongst all that are less than Man. Lord Dunsany Sayings: The fear of dogs is deep and universal amongst all that are less than Man.
So he sat and listened to pigeons talking, till it seemed to him they were trying to lull the restlessness of Earth, and thought that they might by drowsy incantation be putting some spell against time, through which it could not come to harm their nests; for the power of time was not made clear to him yet and he knew not yet that nothing in our fields has the strength to hold out against time. Lord Dunsany Sayings: So he sat and listened to pigeons talking, till it seemed to him they were
Logic, like whiskey, loses its beneficial effect when taken in too large quantities. Lord Dunsany Sayings: Logic, like whiskey, loses its beneficial effect when taken in too large quantities.
Once I found out the secret of the universe. I have forgotten what it was, but I know that the Creator does not take Creation seriously, for I remember that He sat in Space with all His work in front of Him and laughed. Lord Dunsany Sayings: Once I found out the secret of the universe. I have forgotten what it was,
Our lord is a magic lord as we all desired, and magical things have sought him from over there, and they all obey his hests."
"It is so," said all but Gazic. And Gazic rose up in a pause of their gladness.
"Many strange things," he said, "have entered our village, coming from over there. And it may be that human folk are best, and the ways of the fields we know.
Lord Dunsany Sayings: Our lord is a magic lord as we all desired, and magical things have sought
And then he went in the evening up to the nursery and told the boy how his mother was gone for a while to Elfland, to her father's palace (which may only be told of in song). And, unheeding any words of Orion then, he held on with the brief tale that he had come to tell, and told how Elfland was gone.
"But that cannot be," said Orion, "for I hear the horns of Elfland every day."
"You can hear them?" Alveric said.
And the boy replied, "I hear them blowing at evening.
Lord Dunsany Sayings: And then he went in the evening up to the nursery and told the boy
I think that travel comes from some deep urge to see the world, like the urge that brings up a worm in an Irish bog to see the moon when it is full. Lord Dunsany Sayings: I think that travel comes from some deep urge to see the world, like the
And the sword that had visited Earth from so far away smote like the falling of thunderbolts; and green sparks rose from the armour, and crimson as sword met sword; and thick elvish blood moved slowly, from wide slits, down the cuirass; and Lirazel gazed in awe and wonder and love; and the combatants edged away fighting into the forest; and branches fell on them hacked off by their fight; and the runes in Alveric's far-travelled sword exulted, and roared at the elf-knight; until in the dark of the wood, amongst branches severed from disenchanted trees, with a blow like that of a thunderbolt riving an oak tree, Alveric slew him. Lord Dunsany Sayings: And the sword that had visited Earth from so far away smote like the falling
And as the sea wind blew on that high and lonely place, there began to slip away from the voter's mind the meaningless phrases that had crowded it long - thumping majority - victory in the fight - terminological inexactitudes - and the smell of paraffin lamps dangling in classrooms, and quotations taken from ancient speeches because the words were long. Lord Dunsany Sayings: And as the sea wind blew on that high and lonely place, there began to
On a waste place strewn with bricks in the outskirts of a town twilight was falling. A star or two appeared over the smoke, and distant windows lit mysterious lights. The stillness deepened and the loneliness. Then all the outcast things that are silent by day found voices. Lord Dunsany Sayings: On a waste place strewn with bricks in the outskirts of a town twilight was
All we who write put me in mind of sailors hastily making rafts upon doomed ships. When we break up under the heavy years and go down into eternity with all that is ours our thoughts like small lost rafts float on awhile upon Oblivion's sea. They will not carry much over those tides, our names and a phrase or two and little else. Lord Dunsany Sayings: All we who write put me in mind of sailors hastily making rafts upon doomed
Nobody can tell you about that sword all that there is to be told of it; for those that know of those paths of Space on which its metals once floated, till Earth caught them one by one as she sailed past on her orbit, have little time to waste on such things as magic and so cannot tell you how the sword was made, and those who know whence poetry is, and the need that man has for song, or know any one of the fifty branches of magic, have little time to waste on such things as science, and so cannot tell you whence its ingredients came. Enough that it was once beyond our Earth and was now here amongst our mundane stones; that it was once but as those stones, and now had something in it such as soft music has; let those that can define it. Lord Dunsany Sayings: Nobody can tell you about that sword all that there is to be told of
The gardener hath gathered up this autumn's leaves. Who shall see them again, or who wot of them? And who shall say what hath befallen in the days of long ago? Lord Dunsany Sayings: The gardener hath gathered up this autumn's leaves. Who shall see them again, or who