Cadwallader Famous Quotes & Sayings

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8 Cadwallader Famous Sayings, Quotes and Quotation.

Cadwallader Sayings By George Eliot: Mrs. Cadwallader said, privately, 'You will certainly go mad in that house alone, my dear. Mrs. Cadwallader said, privately, 'You will certainly go mad in that house alone, my dear. You will see visions. We have all got to exert ourselves a little to keep sane, and call things by the same names as other people call them by. To be sure, for younger sons and women who have no money, it is a sort of provision to go mad: they are taken care of then. But you must not run into that. I daresay you are a little bored here with our good dowager; but think what a bore you might become yourself to your fellow-creatures if you were always playing tragedy queen and taking things sublimely. Sitting alone in that library at Lowick you may fancy yourself ruling the weather; you must get a few people round you who wouldn't believe you if you told them. That is a good lowering medicine. — George Eliot
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Cadwallader Sayings By George Eliot: In this way, metaphorically speaking, a strong lens applied to Mrs. Cadwallader's match-making will show In this way, metaphorically speaking, a strong lens applied to Mrs. Cadwallader's match-making will show a play of minute causes producing what may be called thought and speech vortices to bring her the sort of food she needed. — George Eliot
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Cadwallader Sayings By Howard Zinn: Middle-class Americans might be invited to join a new elite by attacks against the corruption Middle-class Americans might be invited to join a new elite by attacks against the corruption of the established rich. The New Yorker Cadwallader Colden, in his Address to the Freeholders in 1747, attacked the wealthy as tax dodgers unconcerned with the welfare of others (although he himself was wealthy) and spoke for the honesty and dependability of "the midling rank of mankind" in whom citizens could best trust "our liberty & Property." This was to become a critically important rhetorical device for the rule of the few, who would speak to the many of "our" liberty, "our" property, "our" country. — Howard Zinn
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Cadwallader Sayings By George Eliot: Let any lady who is inclined to be hard on Mrs. Cadwallader inquire into the Let any lady who is inclined to be hard on Mrs. Cadwallader inquire into the comprehensiveness of her own beautiful views, and be quite sure that they afford accommodation for all the lives which have the honor to coexist with hers. With — George Eliot
Cadwallader Sayings By George Eliot: While Celia was gone he walked up and down remembering what he had originally felt While Celia was gone he walked up and down remembering what he had originally felt about Dorothea's engagement, and feeling a revival of his disgust at Mr. Brooke's indifference. If Cadwallader-- if every one else had regarded the affair as he, Sir James, had done, the marriage might have been hindered. It was wicked to let a young girl blindly decide her fate in that way, without any effort to save her. Sir James had long ceased to have any regrets on his own account: his heart was satisfied with his engagement to Celia. But he had a chivalrous nature (was not the disinterested service of woman among the ideal glories of old chivalry?): his disregarded love had not turned to bitterness; its death had made sweet odors-- floating memories that clung with a consecrating effect to Dorothea. He could remain her brotherly friend, interpreting her actions with generous trustfulness. — George Eliot
Cadwallader Sayings By George Eliot: He has got no good red blood in his body," said Sir James."No. Somebody put He has got no good red blood in his body," said Sir James.
"No. Somebody put a drop under a magnifying-glass and it was all semicolons and parentheses," said Mrs. Cadwallader. — George Eliot
Cadwallader Sayings By George Eliot: She says, he is a great soul. - A great bladder for dried peas to She says, he is a great soul. - A great bladder for dried peas to rattle in! said Mrs. Cadwallader. — George Eliot
Cadwallader Sayings By Thomas Love Peacock: The Squire flew over to Mr Escot. "I told you," said he, "I would settle The Squire flew over to Mr Escot. "I told you," said he, "I would settle him: but there is a very hard condition attached to his compliance."
"I submit to it," said Mr Escot, "be it what it may."
"Nothing less," said Squire Headlong, "than the absolute and unconditional surrender of the skull of Cadwallader."
"I resign it," said Mr Escot.
"The skull is yours," said the squire, skipping over to Mr Cranium.
"I am perfectly satisfied," said Mr Cranium.
"The lady is yours," said the squire, skipping back to Mr Escot.
"I am the happiest man alive," said Mr Escot. — Thomas Love Peacock