Charles Lamb As Famous Quotes & Sayings

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38 Charles Lamb As Famous Sayings, Quotes and Quotation.

Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Farrar Browne: My wife is one of the best wimin on this Continent, altho' she isn't always My wife is one of the best wimin on this Continent, altho' she isn't always gentle as a lamb with mint sauce. — Charles Farrar Browne
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Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: and write as a boy and he and write as a boy and he — Charles Lamb
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Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: A child's nature is too serious a thing to admit of its being regarded as A child's nature is too serious a thing to admit of its being regarded as a mere appendage to another being. — Charles Lamb
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Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: What a dead thing is a clock, with its ponderous embowelments of lead and brass, What a dead thing is a clock, with its ponderous embowelments of lead and brass, its pert or solemn dullness of communication, compared with the simple altar-like structure and silent heart-language of the old sundials! It stood as the garden god of Christian gardens. Why is it almost everywhere vanished? If its business-use be superseded by more elaborate inventions, its moral uses, its beauty, might have pleaded for its continuance. — Charles Lamb
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Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: What a place to be in is an old library! It seems as though all What a place to be in is an old library! It seems as though all the souls of all the writers that have bequeathed their labours to these Bodleians were reposing here as in some dormitory, or middle state. I do not want to handle, to profane the leaves, their winding-sheets. I could as soon dislodge a shade. I seem to inhale learning, walking amid their foliage; and the odor of their old moth-scented coverings is fragrant as the first bloom of the sciential apples which grew amid the happy orchard. — Charles Lamb
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Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: A man can never have too much Time to himself, nor too little to do. A man can never have too much Time to himself, nor too little to do. Had I a little son, I would christen him Nothing-To-Do; he should do nothing. Man, I verily believe, is out of his element as long as he is operative. I am altogether for the life contemplative. — Charles Lamb
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Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: Gorgons and Hydras, and Chimaeras - dire stories of Celaeno and the Harpies - may Gorgons and Hydras, and Chimaeras - dire stories of Celaeno and the Harpies - may reproduce themselves in the brain of superstition - but they were there before. They are transcripts, types - the archetypes are in us, and eternal. How else should the recital of that which we know in a waking sense to be false come to affect us at all? Is it that we naturally conceive terror from such objects, considered in their capacity of being able to inflict upon us bodily injury? O, least of all! These terrors are of older standing. They date beyond body - or without the body, they would have been the same ... That the kind of fear here treated is purely spiritual - that it is strong in proportion as it is objectless on earth, that it predominates in the period of our sinless infancy - are difficulties the solution of which might afford some probable insight into our ante-mundane condition, and a peep at least into the shadowland of pre-existence. — Charles Lamb
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Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Haddon Spurgeon: God's people are a hidden people, but when Christ receives his people into heaven, he God's people are a hidden people, but when Christ receives his people into heaven, he will touch them with the wand of his own love, and change them into the image of his manifested glory. They were poor and wretched, but what a transformation! They were stained with sin, but one touch of his finger, and they are bright as the sun, and clear as crystal. Oh! what a manifestation! All this proceeds from the exalted Lamb. Whatever there may be of effulgent splendour, Jesus shall be the centre and soul of it all. Oh! to be present and to see him in his own light, the King of kings, and Lord of lords! — Charles Haddon Spurgeon
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: Half as sober as a judge. Half as sober as a judge. — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: As half in shade and half in sun This world along its path advances, May As half in shade and half in sun This world along its path advances, May that side the sun 's upon Be all that e'er shall meet thy glances! — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: Thus, when the lamp that lighted The traveller at first goes out, He feels awhile Thus, when the lamp that lighted The traveller at first goes out, He feels awhile benighted, And looks around in fear and doubt. But soon, the prospect clearing, By cloudless starlight on he treads, And thinks no lamp so cheering As that light which Heaven sheds. — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: We gain nothing by being with such as ourselves. We encourage one another in mediocrity. We gain nothing by being with such as ourselves. We encourage one another in mediocrity. I am always longing to be with men more excellent than myself. — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: Here cometh April again, and as far as I can see the world hath more Here cometh April again, and as far as I can see the world hath more fools in it than ever. — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: I toiled after it, sir, as some men toil after virtue. I toiled after it, sir, as some men toil after virtue. — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: As down in the sunless retreats of the ocean Sweet flowers are springing no mortal As down in the sunless retreats of the ocean Sweet flowers are springing no mortal can see, So deep in my soul the still prayer of devotion, Unheard by the world, rises silent to Thee. As still to the star of its worship, though clouded, The needle points faithfully o'er the dim sea, So dark when I roam in this wintry world shrouded, The hope of my spirit turns trembling to Thee. — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: Ay, down to the dust with them, slaves as they are! From this hour let Ay, down to the dust with them, slaves as they are! From this hour let the blood in their dastardly veins, That shrunk at the first touch of Liberty's war, Be wasted for tyrants, or stagnate in chains. — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: The pilasters reaching down were adorned with a glistering substance (I know not what) under The pilasters reaching down were adorned with a glistering substance (I know not what) under glass (as it seemed), resembling - a homely fancy, but I judged it to be sugar-candy; yet to my raised imagination, divested of its homelier qualities, it appeared a glorified candy. — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Haddon Spurgeon: Just as I am, without one plea But that Thy blood was shed for me, Just as I am, without one plea But that Thy blood was shed for me, And that thou bidd'st me come to Thee, O Lamb of God, I come! — Charles Haddon Spurgeon
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: The going away of friends does not make the remainder more precious. It takes so The going away of friends does not make the remainder more precious. It takes so much from them as there was a common link. A. B. and C. make a party. A. dies. B. not only loses A. but all A.'s part in C. C. loses A.'s part in B., and so the alphabet sickens by subtraction of interchangeables. — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: I conceive disgust at those impertinent and misbecoming familiarities, inscribed upon your ordinary tombstones. Every I conceive disgust at those impertinent and misbecoming familiarities, inscribed upon your ordinary tombstones. Every dead man must take upon himself to be lecturing me with his odious truism, that "such as he now is, I must shortly be." Not so shortly, friend, perhaps, as thou imaginest. In the meantime I am alive. I move about. I am worth twenty of thee. Know thy betters! — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: Nothing puzzles me more than time and space; and yet nothing troubles me less, as Nothing puzzles me more than time and space; and yet nothing troubles me less, as I never think about them. — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Haddon Spurgeon: Thou art seeking Christ, close not those eyes, turn not away thy face from Calvary's Thou art seeking Christ, close not those eyes, turn not away thy face from Calvary's streaming tree: now that Satan hinders thee, it is because the night is almost over, and the day-star begins to shine. Brethren, ye who are most molested, most sorrowfully tried, most borne down, yours is the brighter hope: be now courageous; play the man for God, for Christ, for your own soul, and yet the day shall come when you with your Master shall ride triumphant through the streets of the New Jerusalem, sin, death, and hell, captive at your chariot wheels, and you with your Lord crowned as victor, having overcome through the blood of the Lamb. May God bless dear friends now present. I do not know to whom this sermon may be most suitable, but I believe it is sent especially to certain tried saints. — Charles Haddon Spurgeon
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: If thou would'st have me sing and play As once I play'd and sung, First If thou would'st have me sing and play As once I play'd and sung, First take this time-worn lute away, And bring one freshly strung. — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Haddon Spurgeon: Quietly contemplate the Lamb as the light of heaven. Light in Scripture is the emblem Quietly contemplate the Lamb as the light of heaven. Light in Scripture is the emblem of joy. The joy of the saints in heaven is comprised in this: Jesus chose us, loved us, bought us, cleansed us, robed us, kept us, glorified us: we are here entirely through the Lord Jesus. — Charles Haddon Spurgeon
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: I am accounted by some people as a good man. How cheap that character is I am accounted by some people as a good man. How cheap that character is acquired! Pay your debts, don't borrow money, nor twist your kitten's neck off, nor disturb a congregation, etc., your business is done. I know things of myself, which would make every friend I have fly me as a plague patient. — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: Surely it is a matter of joy, that your faith in Jesus has been preserved; Surely it is a matter of joy, that your faith in Jesus has been preserved; the Comforter that should relieve you is not far from you. But as you are a Christian, in the name of that Saviour, who was filled with bitterness and made druken with wormwood, I conjre you to have recourse in frequent prayer to 'his God and your God,' the God of mercies, and father of all comfort. Your poor father is, I hope, almost senseless of the calamity; the unconscious instrument of Divine Providence knows it not, and your mother is in heaven. — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: It is rather an unpleasant fact, that the ugliest and awkwardest of brute animals have It is rather an unpleasant fact, that the ugliest and awkwardest of brute animals have the greatest resemblance to man: the monkey and the bear. The monkey is ugly too (so we think) because he is like man
as the bear is awkward, because the cumbrous action of its huge paws seems to be a preposterous imitation of the motions of human hands. Men and apes are the only animals that have hairs on the under eye-lid. Let kings know this. — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: Whose wit in the combat, as gentle as bright, Ne'er carried a heart-stain away on Whose wit in the combat, as gentle as bright, Ne'er carried a heart-stain away on its blade. — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: The harp that once through Tara's halls The soul of music shed, Now hangs as The harp that once through Tara's halls The soul of music shed, Now hangs as mute on Tara's walls As if that soul were fled. So sleeps the pride of former days, So glory's thrill is o'er; And hearts that once beat high for praise Now feel that pulse no more. — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: We are ashamed at the sight of a monkeysomehow as we are shy of poor We are ashamed at the sight of a monkey
somehow as we are shy of poor relations. — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: I have passed all my days in London, until I have formed as many and I have passed all my days in London, until I have formed as many and intense local attachments as any of you mountaineers can have done with dead nature. — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: 'That Enough Is As Good As a Feast' ... The inventor of [this saying] did 'That Enough Is As Good As a Feast'
... The inventor of [this saying] did not believe it himself ... Goodly legs and shoulders of mutton, exhilarating cordials, books, pictures, the opportunities of seeing foreign countries, independence, heart's ease, a man's own time to himself, are not muck - however we may be pleased to scandalise with that appellation the faithful metal that provides them for us. — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: Antiquity! thou wondrous charm, what art thou? that being nothing art everything? When thou wert, Antiquity! thou wondrous charm, what art thou? that being nothing art everything? When thou wert, thou wert not antiquity - then thou wert nothing, but hadst a remoter antiquity, as thou calledst it, to look back to with blind veneration; thou thyself being to thyself flat, jejune, modern! What mystery lurks in this retroversion? or what half Januses are we, that cannot look forward with the same idolatry with which we for ever revert! The mighty future is as nothing, being everything! the past is everything, being nothing! — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: Summer, as my friend Coleridge waggishly writes, has set in with its usual severity. Summer, as my friend Coleridge waggishly writes, has set in with its usual severity. — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: There is absolutely no such thing as reading but by a candle. We have tried There is absolutely no such thing as reading but by a candle. We have tried the affectation of a book at noon-day in gardens, and in sultry arbours, but it was labor thrown away. Those gay motes in the beam come about you, hovering and teasing, like so many coquets, that will have you all to their self, and are jealous of your abstractions. By the midnight taper, the writers digests his meditations. By the same light we must approach to their perusal, if we would catch the flame, the odour. — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: We do not go to the theatre like our ancestors, to escape from the pressure We do not go to the theatre like our ancestors, to escape from the pressure of reality, so much as to confirm our experience of it. — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By Charles Lamb: There is not in the wide world a valley so sweet As that vale in There is not in the wide world a valley so sweet As that vale in whose bosom the bright waters meet. — Charles Lamb
Charles Lamb As Sayings By William James: As Charles Lamb says, there is nothing so nice as doing good by stealth and As Charles Lamb says, there is nothing so nice as doing good by stealth and being found out by accident, so I now say it is even nicer to make heroic decisions and to be prevented by 'circumstances beyond your control' from ever trying to execute them. — William James