Corsica Famous Quotes & Sayings

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14 Corsica Famous Sayings, Quotes and Quotation.

Corsica Sayings By William Goldman: Be careful, this is the greatest fencer since the death of the Wizard of Corsica. Be careful, this is the greatest fencer since the death of the Wizard of Corsica. Do not burgle. — William Goldman
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Corsica Sayings By Andrew Roberts: The Italian city-state of Genoa had nominally ruled Corsica for over two centuries, but rarely The Italian city-state of Genoa had nominally ruled Corsica for over two centuries, but rarely tried to extend her control beyond the coastal towns into the mountainous interior, where the Corsicans were fiercely independent. In 1755 Corsica's charismatic nationalist leader, Pasquale Paoli, proclaimed an independent republic, a notion that became — Andrew Roberts
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Corsica Sayings By Steven Pinker: It's a little-known fact that most terrorist groups fail, and that all of them die. It's a little-known fact that most terrorist groups fail, and that all of them die. Lest this seem hard to believe, just reflect on the world around you. Israel continues to exist, Northern Ireland is still a part of the United Kingdom, and Kashmir is a part of India. There are no sovereign states in Kurdistan, Palestine, Quebec, Puerto Rico, Chechnya, Corsica, Tamil Eelam, or Basque Country. The Philippines, Algeria, Egypt, and Uzbekistan are not Islamist theocracies; nor have Japan, the United States, Europe, and Latin America become religious, Marxist, anarchist, or new-age utopias. The numbers confirm the impressions. — Steven Pinker
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Corsica Sayings By Andrew Roberts: Napoleone di Buonaparte, as he signed himself until manhood, was born in Ajaccio, one of Napoleone di Buonaparte, as he signed himself until manhood, was born in Ajaccio, one of the larger towns on the Mediterranean island of Corsica, just before noon on Tuesday, August 15, 1769. — Andrew Roberts
Corsica Sayings By Lucy Foley: It was then I thought of Corsica, the place we had discovered together. I craved It was then I thought of Corsica, the place we had discovered together. I craved the wind, the sun and salt, the simplicity of the island. — Lucy Foley
Corsica Sayings By Peter O'Toole: I did quite enjoy the days when one went for a beer at one's local I did quite enjoy the days when one went for a beer at one's local in Paris and woke up in Corsica. — Peter O'Toole
Corsica Sayings By Frederic William Farrar: The decision of such judges as Claudius and his Senate is worth very little in The decision of such judges as Claudius and his Senate is worth very little in the question of a man's innocence or guilt; but the sentence was that Seneca should be banished to the island of Corsica. — Frederic William Farrar
Corsica Sayings By Prosper Merimee: It strikes me you might place your gifts better. Why should you send powder to It strikes me you might place your gifts better. Why should you send powder to a ruffian who will use it to commit crimes? But for the deplorable weakness every one here seems to have for the bandits, they would have disappeared out of Corsica long ago."
"The worst men in our country are not those who are 'in the country.'"
"Give them bread, if it so please you. But I will not have you supply them with ammunition."
"Brother," said Colomba, in a serious voice, "you are master here, and everything in this house belongs to you. But I warn you that I will give this little girl my mezzaro, so that she may sell it; rather than refuse powder to a bandit. — Prosper Merimee
Corsica Sayings By Laetitia Casta: Water makes me feel at peace. In Corsica, I spend most of my time on Water makes me feel at peace. In Corsica, I spend most of my time on the beaches or in the rivers. That's one reason I love it there so much. The water is so clean and fresh - you can drink it straight out of the rivers! This island is my secret garden. — Laetitia Casta
Corsica Sayings By Gene Wilder: As they say in Corsica... Goodbye As they say in Corsica... Goodbye — Gene Wilder
Corsica Sayings By Joseph Devlin: In other fields of endeavor poverty has been the spur to action. Napoleon was born In other fields of endeavor poverty has been the spur to action. Napoleon was born in obscurity, the son of a hand-to-mouth scrivener in the backward island of Corsica. Abraham Lincoln, the boast and pride of America, the man who made this land too hot for the feet of slaves, came from a log cabin in the Ohio backwoods. So did James A. Garfield. Ulysses Grant came from a tanyard to become the world's greatest general. Thomas A. Edison commenced as a newsboy on a railway train. — Joseph Devlin
Corsica Sayings By Nick Hornby: One can only presume that people who say that their favorite record of all time One can only presume that people who say that their favorite record of all time reminds them of their honeymoon in Corsica, or of their family Chihuahua, don't actually like music very much. — Nick Hornby
Corsica Sayings By Winston S. Churchill: That religion, which above all others was founded and propagated by the sword - the That religion, which above all others was founded and propagated by the sword - the tenets and principles of which are instinct with incentives to slaughter and which in three continents has produced fighting breeds of men - stimulates a wild and merciless fanaticism. The love of plunder, always a characteristic of hill tribes, is fostered by the spectacle of opulence and luxury which, to their eyes, the cities and plains of the south display. A code of honour not less punctilious than that of old Spain is supported by vendettas as implacable as those of Corsica. — Winston S. Churchill
Corsica Sayings By Paddy Dillon: There is no doubt that the GR20, traversing the rugged mountains of Corsica, is one There is no doubt that the GR20, traversing the rugged mountains of Corsica, is one of the top trails of the world. Its reputation precedes it, and most walkers who trek the route describe it afterwards as one of the toughest they have ever completed. Others find they are unable to complete it, having seriously underestimated its nature. The GR20 climbs high into the mountains and stays there for days on end, leading ordinary walkers deep into the sort of terrain usually visited only by mountaineers. The scenery is awe-inspiring, with bare rock and vertical lines in some parts, contrasting with forests, lakes and alpine pastures in other places. Those — Paddy Dillon