Darwin Species Famous Quotes & Sayings

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100 Darwin Species Famous Sayings, Quotes and Quotation.

Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: We behold the face of nature bright with gladness. We behold the face of nature bright with gladness. — Charles Darwin
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Darwin Species Sayings By Erasmus Darwin: So the horns of the stag are sharp to offend his adversary, but are branched So the horns of the stag are sharp to offend his adversary, but are branched for the purpose of parrying or receiving the thrusts of horns similar to his own, and have therefore been formed for the purpose of combating other stags for the exclusive possession of the females; who are observed, like the ladies in the times of chivalry, to attend to the car of the victor. The final cause of this contest amongst the males seems to be, that the strongest and most active animal should propagate the species, which should thence become improved. — Erasmus Darwin
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Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: Species that struggle to adapt to survive will become extinct Species that struggle to adapt to survive will become extinct — Charles Darwin
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Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: Now when naturalists observe a close agreement in numerous small details of habits, tastes and Now when naturalists observe a close agreement in numerous small details of habits, tastes and dispositions between two or more domestic races, or between nearly-allied natural forms, they use this fact as an argument that all are descended from a common progenitor who was thus endowed; and consequently that all should be classed under the same species. The same argument may be applied with much force to the races of man. — Charles Darwin
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Darwin Species Sayings By Sarah Perry: he was at heart profoundly conservative and would not keep the works of Darwin or he was at heart profoundly conservative and would not keep the works of Darwin or Lyell in his study for fear they carried a contagion that might spread throughout his healthier books. He was not an especially devout man, but felt that a common faith overlooked by a benevolent God was what kept the fabric of society from tearing like a worn sheet. The idea that after all there was no essential nobility in mankind, and that his own species was not a chosen people touched by the divine, troubled him in the hours before dawn; and as with most troubling matters he elected to ignore it, until it went away. — Sarah Perry
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Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: Not one change of species into another is on record ... we cannot prove that Not one change of species into another is on record ... we cannot prove that a single species has been changed. — Charles Darwin
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Darwin Species Sayings By J. Warner Wallace: Dawkins recognizes the power irreducible complexity has to falsify naturalistic explanations (like any combination of Dawkins recognizes the power irreducible complexity has to falsify naturalistic explanations (like any combination of chance, natural law, or natural selection). Even Charles Darwin acknowledged this dilemma when he wrote On the Origin of Species: "If it could be demonstrated that any complex organ existed which could not possibly have been formed by numerous, successive, slight modifications, my theory would absolutely break down."19 — J. Warner Wallace
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Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: It is not the most intellectual of the species that survives; it is not the It is not the most intellectual of the species that survives; it is not the strongest that survives; but the species that survives is the one that is able best to adapt and adjust to the changing environment in which it finds itself. — Charles Darwin
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Darwin Species Sayings By Lev Shestov: If Darwin had seen in life what Dostoevsky saw, he would not have talked of If Darwin had seen in life what Dostoevsky saw, he would not have talked of the law of the preservation of species, but of its destruction. — Lev Shestov
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Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: As many more individuals of each species are born than can possibly survive; and as, As many more individuals of each species are born than can possibly survive; and as, consequently, there is a frequently recurring struggle for existence, it follows that any being, if it vary however slightly in any manner profitable to itself, under the complex and sometimes varying conditions of life, will have a better chance of surviving, and thus be naturally selected. From the strong principle of inheritance, any selected variety will tend to propagate its new and modified form. — Charles Darwin
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Darwin Species Sayings By William Bateson: It was in the attempt to ascertain the interrelationships between species that experiments n genetics It was in the attempt to ascertain the interrelationships between species that experiments n genetics were first made. The words "evolution" and "origin of species" are now so intimately associated with the name of Darwin that we are apt to forger that the idea of common descent had been prominent in the mnds of naturalists before he wrote, and that, for more than half a century, zealous investigators had been devoting themselves to the experimental study of that possibility. Prominent among this group of experimenters may be mentioned Koelreauter, John Hunter, Herbert Knight, Gartner, Jordan. Naudin, Godron, Lecoq, Wichura
men whose names are familiar to every reader of Animals and Plants unders Domestication. — William Bateson
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Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: The number of living creatures of all orders whose existence intimately depends on kelp is The number of living creatures of all orders whose existence intimately depends on kelp is wonderful. A great volume might be written describing the inhabitants of one of these beds of seaweed ... . I can only compare these great aquatic forests ... with terrestrial ones in the intertropical regions. Yet, if in any other country a forest was destroyed, I do not believe so many species of animals would perish as would here, from the destruction of kelp — Charles Darwin
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Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: Great as the differences are between the breeds of pigeons, I am fully convinced that Great as the differences are between the breeds of pigeons, I am fully convinced that the common opinion of naturalists is correct, namely, that all have descended from the rock-pigeon (Columba livia), including under this term several geographical races or sub-species, which differ from each other in the most trifling respects. — Charles Darwin
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Darwin Species Sayings By Mark Twain: Darwin abolished special creations, contributed the Origin of Species and hitched all life together in Darwin abolished special creations, contributed the Origin of Species and hitched all life together in one unbroken procession. — Mark Twain
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Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: I am almost convinced (quite contrary to opinion I started with) that species are not I am almost convinced (quite contrary to opinion I started with) that species are not (it is like confessing a murder) immutable. — Charles Darwin
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Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: Sexual selection will also be largely dominated by natural selection tending towards the general welfare Sexual selection will also be largely dominated by natural selection tending towards the general welfare of the species. — Charles Darwin
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Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: Why, if species have descended from other species by insensibly fine gradations, do we not Why, if species have descended from other species by insensibly fine gradations, do we not everywhere see innumerable transitional forms. — Charles Darwin
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Darwin Species Sayings By Thomas Henry Huxley: The publication of the Darwin and Wallace papers in 1858, and still more that of The publication of the Darwin and Wallace papers in 1858, and still more that of the 'Origin' in 1859, had the effect upon them of the flash of light, which to a man who has lost himself in a dark night, suddenly reveals a road which, whether it takes him straight home or not, certainly goes his way. That which we were looking for, and could not find, was a hypothesis respecting the origin of known organic forms, which assumed the operation of no causes but such as could be proved to be actually at work. We wanted, not to pin our faith to that or any other speculation, but to get hold of clear and definite conceptions which could be brought face to face with facts and have their validity tested. The 'Origin' provided us with the working hypothesis we sought. — Thomas Henry Huxley
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Darwin Species Sayings By Alan H. Linton: Throughout 150 years of the science of bacteriology, there is no evidence that one species Throughout 150 years of the science of bacteriology, there is no evidence that one species of bacteria has changed into another ... Since there is no evidence for species changes between the simplest forms of unicellular life, it is not surprising that there is no evidence for evolution from prokaryotic [i.e., bacterial] to eukaryotic [i.e., plant and animal] cells, let alone throughout the whole array of higher multicellular organisms. — Alan H. Linton
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Darwin Species Sayings By Philippe Kahn: The key word is flexibility, the ability to adapt constantly. Darwin said it clearly. People The key word is flexibility, the ability to adapt constantly. Darwin said it clearly. People thought that he mainly talked about survival of the fittest. What he said was that the species that survive are usually not the smartest or the strongest, but the ones most responsive to change. So being attentive to customers and potential partners is my best advice
after, of course, perseverance and patience. — Philippe Kahn
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Darwin Species Sayings By Jeff Schweitzer: When Charles Darwin published On the Origin of Species in 1859, he exposed the world When Charles Darwin published On the Origin of Species in 1859, he exposed the world to a momentous discovery . For the first time in history, human beings were seen not as creatures of divine origin, but instead, as a product of nature, an animal like every other on the planet. Imagine yourself back in that amazing year. The day before Darwin's book was published, you wake up thinking yourself the image of God; the next morning you realize you have the face of a monkey. Not everybody immediately embraced this rude demotion from god to goat. — Jeff Schweitzer
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Darwin Species Sayings By Thomas Henry Huxley: The facts of variability, of the struggle for existence, of adaptation to conditions, were notorious The facts of variability, of the struggle for existence, of adaptation to conditions, were notorious enough; but none of us had suspected that the road to the heart of the species problem lay through them, until Darwin and Wallace dispelled the darkness. — Thomas Henry Huxley
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Darwin Species Sayings By Niles Eldredge: If it is true that an influx of doubt and uncertainty actually marks periods of If it is true that an influx of doubt and uncertainty actually marks periods of healthy growth in a science, then evolutionary biology is flourishing today as it seldom has flourished in the past. For biologists collectively are less agreed upon the details of evolutionary mechanics than they were a scant decade ago. Superficially, it seems as if we know less about evolution than we did in 1959, the centennial year of Darwin's on the Origin of Species. — Niles Eldredge
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Darwin Species Sayings By Niles Eldredge: The observation that species are amazingly conservative and static entities throughout long periods of time The observation that species are amazingly conservative and static entities throughout long periods of time has all the qualities of the emperor's new clothes: everyone knew it but preferred to ignore it. Paleontologists, faced with a recalcitrant record obstinately refusing to yield Darwin's predicted pattern, simply looked the other way. — Niles Eldredge
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Darwin Species Sayings By John Steinbeck: [ ... ] it is a strange thing that most of the feeling we call [ ... ] it is a strange thing that most of the feeling we call religious, most of the mystical outcrying which is one of the most prized and used and desired reactions of our species, is really the understanding and the attempt to say that man is related to the whole thing, related inextricably to all reality, known and unknowable. This is a simple thing to say, but the profound feeling of it made a Jesus, a St. Augustine, a St. Francis, a Roger Bacon, a Charles Darwin, and an Einstein. Each of them in his own tempo and with his own voice discovered and reaffirmed with astonishment the knowledge that all things are one thing and that one thing is all things - plankton, a shimmering phosphorescence on the sea and the spinning planets and an expanding universe, all bound together by the elastic string of time. It is advisable to look from the tide pool to the stars and then back to the tide pool again. — John Steinbeck
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Darwin Species Sayings By Thomas Henry Huxley: Very few, even among those who have taken the keenest interest in the progress of Very few, even among those who have taken the keenest interest in the progress of the revolution in natural knowledge set afoot by the publication of the 'Origin of Species'; and who have watched, not without astonishment, the rapid and complete change which has been effected both inside and outside the boundaries of the scientific world in the attitude of men's minds towards the doctrines which are expounded in that great work, can have been prepared for the extraordinary manifestation of affectionate regard for the man, and of profound reverence for the philosopher, which followed the announcement, on Thursday last, of the death of Mr Darwin. — Thomas Henry Huxley
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Darwin Species Sayings By Richard Owen: Mr. Darwin refers to the multitude of the individual of every species, which, from one Mr. Darwin refers to the multitude of the individual of every species, which, from one cause or another, perish either before, or soon after attaining maturity. — Richard Owen
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Darwin Species Sayings By Alexander McQueen: When Charles Darwin wrote The Origin Of The Species, no one could have known that When Charles Darwin wrote The Origin Of The Species, no one could have known that the ice cap would melt, that the waters would rise and that life on earth would have to evolve in order to live beneath the sea once more or perish. We came from water and now, with the help of stem cell technology and cloning, we must go back to it to survive.When the waters rise, humanity will go back to the place from whence it came.Make no mistake, this is not sci-fi, this is evolution — Alexander McQueen
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Darwin Species Sayings By Friedrich Nietzsche: Species do not grow more perfect: the weaker dominate the strong, again and again- the Species do not grow more perfect: the weaker dominate the strong, again and again- the reason being that they are the great majority, and they are also cleverer. Darwin forgot the mind (-that is English!): the weak possess more mind ... To acquire mind, one must need mind-one loses it when one no longer needs it. — Friedrich Nietzsche
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Darwin Species Sayings By Daniel Dennett: For more than a century, people have often thought that the conclusion to draw from For more than a century, people have often thought that the conclusion to draw from Darwin's vision is that Homo sapiens, our species - and we're just animals too, we're just mammals - that there is nothing morally special about us. I myself don't think this follows at all from Darwin's vision, but it is certainly the received view in many quarters. — Daniel Dennett
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Darwin Species Sayings By George Gaylord Simpson: Among the things most characteristic of organisms--most distinctive of living as opposed to inorganic systems--is Among the things most characteristic of organisms--most distinctive of living as opposed to inorganic systems--is a sort of directedness. Their structures and activities have an adaptedness, an evident and vital usefulness to the organism. Darwin's answer and ours is to accept the common sense view...[that] the end ("telos") [is] that the individual and the species may survive. But this end is (usually) unconscious and impersonal. Naive teleology is controverted not by ignoring the obvious existence of such ends but by providing a naturalistic, materialistic explanation of the adaptive characteristics serving them. [Book review in "Science," 1959, p. 673.] — George Gaylord Simpson
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Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: This fundamental subject of Natural Selection will be treated at some length in the fourth This fundamental subject of Natural Selection will be treated at some length in the fourth chapter; and we shall then see how Natural Selection almost inevitably causes much Extinction of the less improved forms of life and induces what I have called Divergence of Character. In the next chapter I shall discuss the complex and little known laws of variation and of correlation of growth. In the four succeeding chapters, the most apparent and gravest difficulties on the theory will be given: namely, first, the difficulties of transitions, or in understanding how a simple being or a simple organ can be changed and perfected into a highly developed being or elaborately constructed organ; secondly the subject of Instinct, or the mental powers of animals, thirdly, Hybridism, or the infertility of species and the fertility of varieties when intercrossed; and fourthly, the imperfection of the Geological Record. In — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Ernst Mayr: Paleontologists had long been aware of a seeming contradiction between Darwin's postulate of gradualism, confirmed Paleontologists had long been aware of a seeming contradiction between Darwin's postulate of gradualism, confirmed by the work of population genetics, and the actual findings of paleontology. Following phyletic lines through time seemed to reveal only minimal gradual changes but no clear evidence for any change of a species into a different genus or for the gradual origin of an evolutionary novelty. Anything truly novel always seemed to appear quite abruptly in the fossil record. — Ernst Mayr
Darwin Species Sayings By Rachel Carson: From a ball of mud taken from a birds plumage, Charles Darwin raised 82 separate From a ball of mud taken from a birds plumage, Charles Darwin raised 82 separate plants, belonging to five distinct species! — Rachel Carson
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: On the ordinary view of each species having been independently created, we gain no scientific On the ordinary view of each species having been independently created, we gain no scientific explanation. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: It is really laughable to see what different ideas are prominent in various naturalists' minds, It is really laughable to see what different ideas are prominent in various naturalists' minds, when they speak of 'species'; in some, resemblance is everything and descent of little weight-in some, resemblance seems to go for nothing, and Creation the reigning idea-in some, descent is the key,-in some, sterility an unfailing test, with others it is not worth a farthing. It all comes, I believe, from trying to define the undefinable. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Asa Gray: We have really, that I know of, no philosophical basis for high and low. Moreover, We have really, that I know of, no philosophical basis for high and low. Moreover, the vegetable kingdom does not culminate, as the animal kingdom does. It is not a kingdom, but a common-wealth; a democracy, and therefore puzzling and unaccountable from the former point of view. — Asa Gray
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: I have stated, that in the thirteen species of ground-finches, a nearly perfect gradation may I have stated, that in the thirteen species of ground-finches, a nearly perfect gradation may be traced, from a beak extraordinarily thick, to one so fine, that it may be compared to that of a warbler. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Gareth J. Nelson: The idea that one can go to the fossil record and expect to empirically recover The idea that one can go to the fossil record and expect to empirically recover an ancestor-descendant sequence, be it of species, genera, families, or whatever, has been, and continues to be, a pernicious illusion. — Gareth J. Nelson
Darwin Species Sayings By Joseph Dalton Hooker: I expect to think that I would rather be author of your book [The Origin I expect to think that I would rather be author of your book [The Origin of Species] than of any other on Nat. Hist. Science.
[Letter to Charles Darwin 12 Dec 1859] — Joseph Dalton Hooker
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: Intelligence is based on how efficient a species became at doing the things they need Intelligence is based on how efficient a species became at doing the things they need to survive. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By David M. Raup: 250,000 species of plants and animals recorded and deposited in museums throughout the world did 250,000 species of plants and animals recorded and deposited in museums throughout the world did not support the gradual unfolding hoped for by Darwin. — David M. Raup
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: Hereafter we shall be compelled to acknowledge that the only distinction between species and well-marked Hereafter we shall be compelled to acknowledge that the only distinction between species and well-marked varieties is, that the latter are known, or believed to be connected at the present day by intermediate gradations whereas species were formerly thus connected. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: I am fully convinced that species are not immutable; but that those belonging to what I am fully convinced that species are not immutable; but that those belonging to what are called the same genera are lineal descendants of some other and generally extinct species, in the same manner as the acknowledged varieties of any one species are the descendants of that species. Furthermore, I am convinced that natural selection has been the most important, but not the exclusive, means of modification. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Ludwig Wittgenstein: I have always thought that Darwin was wrong: his theory doesn't account for all this I have always thought that Darwin was wrong: his theory doesn't account for all this variety of species. It hasn't the necessary multiplicity. Nowadays some people are fond of saying that at last evolution has produced a species that is able to understand the whole process which gave it birth. Now that you can't say.
[Drury, Conversation with Wittgenstein, p174] — Ludwig Wittgenstein
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: It has sometimes been said that the success of the Origin proved "that the subject It has sometimes been said that the success of the Origin proved "that the subject was in the air," or "that men's minds were prepared for it." I do not think that this is strictly true, for I occasionally sounded not a few naturalists, and never happened to come across a single one who seemed to doubt about the permanence of species. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Dan Simmons: I remembered Grandam telling me about an early Old Earth scientist, one Charles Darwin, who I remembered Grandam telling me about an early Old Earth scientist, one Charles Darwin, who had come up with one of the early theories of evolution or gravitation or somesuch, and how - although raised a devout Christian even before the reward of the cruciform - he had become an atheist while studying a terrestrial wasp that paralyzed some large species of spider, planted its embryo, and let the spider recover and go about its business until it was time for the hatched wasp larvae to burrow its way out of the living spider's abdomen. — Dan Simmons
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: Why is The Origin of Species such a great book? First of all, because it Why is The Origin of Species such a great book? First of all, because it convincingly demonstrates the fact of evolution: it provides a vast and well-chosen body of evidence showing that existing animals and plants cannot have been separately created in their present forms, but must have evolved from earlier forms by slow transformation. And secondly, because the theory of natural selection, which the Origin so fully and so lucidly expounds, provides a mechanism by which such transformation could and would automatically be produced. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Diarmaid MacCulloch: The only way in which Darwin's data made sense was to suppose that species battled The only way in which Darwin's data made sense was to suppose that species battled for survival, and that evolution came when one slight adaptation of a species proved more successful than another in the battle: a process which he named 'natural selection'. There was nothing benevolent about the providence which watched over the process. Reason was served her notice as the handmaid of Christian revelation. — Diarmaid MacCulloch
Darwin Species Sayings By Karl Pearson: The starting point of Darwin's theory of evolution is precisely the existence of those differences The starting point of Darwin's theory of evolution is precisely the existence of those differences between individual members of a race or species which morphologists for the most part rightly neglect. The first condition necessary, in order that any process of Natural Selection may begin among a race, or species, is the existence of differences among its members; and the first step in an enquiry into the possible effect of a selective process upon any character of a race must be an estimate of the frequency with which individuals, exhibiting any given degree of abnormality with respect to that, character, occur. The unit, with which such an enquiry must deal, is not an individual but a race, or a statistically representative sample of a race; and the result must take the form of a numerical statement, showing the relative frequency with which the various kinds of individuals composing the race occur. — Karl Pearson
Darwin Species Sayings By Dale Carnegie: Let's find and remedy all our weaknesses before our enemies get a chance to say Let's find and remedy all our weaknesses before our enemies get a chance to say a word. That is what Charles Darwin did ... When Darwin completed the manuscript of his immortal book "The Origin Of Species" he realized that the publication of his revolutionary concept of creation would rock the intellectual and religious worlds. So he became his own critic and spent another 15 years checking his data, challenging his reasoning, and criticizing his conclusions. — Dale Carnegie
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: Owing to this struggle for life, any variation, however slight and from whatever cause proceeding, Owing to this struggle for life, any variation, however slight and from whatever cause proceeding, if it be in any degree profitable to an individual of any species, in its infinitely complex relationship to other organic beings and to external nature, will tend to the preservation of that individual, and will generally be inherited by its offspring. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: At last gleams of light have come, and I am almost convinced (quite contrary to At last gleams of light have come, and I am almost convinced (quite contrary to opinion I started with) that species are not (it is like confessing a murder) immutable. Heaven forfend me from Lamarck nonsense of a 'tendency to progression', 'adaptations from the slow willing of animals', &c! But the conclusions I am led to are not widely different from his; though the means of change are wholly so. I think I have found out (here's presumption!) the simple way by which species become exquisitely adapted to various ends. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: A language, like a species, when extinct, never ... reappears. A language, like a species, when extinct, never ... reappears. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Yuval Noah Harari: Over the past 10,000 years, Homo sapiens has grown so accustomed to being the only Over the past 10,000 years, Homo sapiens has grown so accustomed to being the only human species that it's hard for us to conceive of any other possibility. Our lack of brothers and sisters makes it easier to imagine that we are the epitome of creation, and that a chasm separates us from the rest of the animal kingdom. When Charles Darwin indicated that Homo sapiens was just another kind of animal, people were outraged. Even today many refuse to believe it. Had the Neanderthals survived, would we still imagine ourselves to be a creature apart? Perhaps this is exactly why our ancestors wiped out the Neanderthals. They were too familiar to ignore, but too different to tolerate. Whether — Yuval Noah Harari
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: We here see in two distant countries a similar relation between plants and insects of We here see in two distant countries a similar relation between plants and insects of the same families, though the species of both are different. When man is the agent in introducing into a country a new species this relation is often broken: — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Daniel Suarez: There is a great deal more to evolutionary biology than survival of the fittest - There is a great deal more to evolutionary biology than survival of the fittest - although that's all anyone seems to remember. One of Darwin's contemporaries was Alfred Russel Wallace, who had even more profound lessons about evolution - that humans are social creatures. That we coevolve with other species as part of a fabric of interwoven and interdependent life-forms. The world isn't entirely about competition and dominance. And species that cooperate with others succeed better than those who do not. That's what civilization is, cooperation." "And — Daniel Suarez
Darwin Species Sayings By Joel A. Barker: When most of us hear the phrase, 'survival of the fittest,' we assume it originated When most of us hear the phrase, 'survival of the fittest,' we assume it originated with Charles Darwin. It did not. The phrase doesn't exist anywhere in Darwin's first edition of 'Origin of the Species.' — Joel A. Barker
Darwin Species Sayings By Albert-Laszlo Barabasi: In a completely different era and domain, Charles Darwin hypothesized that the emergence of each In a completely different era and domain, Charles Darwin hypothesized that the emergence of each new species was a gradual process, taking place through the slow transformation of existing species into their somewhat-modified offspring. Yet evidence for such continuous change was not only lacking back then but is scarce even today, having prompted Darwin to label it "the gravest objection [that] can be urged against my theory." Instead, over millions of years species in the fossil record show little or no evolutionary change. New species tend to appear over periods spanning tens of thousands of years, a split second in terms of all evolutionary time. Evolution proceeds in bursts, which are in turn preserved in the fossil record. — Albert-Laszlo Barabasi
Darwin Species Sayings By Julian Huxley: Sir Julian Huxley, one of the world's leading evolutionists, head of UNESCO, descendant of Thomas Sir Julian Huxley, one of the world's leading evolutionists, head of UNESCO, descendant of Thomas Huxley - Darwin's bulldog - said on a talk show, 'I suppose the reason we leaped at The Origin of Species was because the idea of God interfered with our sexual mores.'. — Julian Huxley
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: A grain in the balance will determine which individual shall live and which shall die A grain in the balance will determine which individual shall live and which shall die - which variety or species shall increase in number, and which shall decrease, or finally become extinct. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By David M. Raup: We now have a quarter of a million fossil species, but the situation hasn't changed We now have a quarter of a million fossil species, but the situation hasn't changed much ... We have even fewer examples of evolutionary transition than we had in Darwin's time. — David M. Raup
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: When the views entertained in this volume on the origin of species, or when analogous When the views entertained in this volume on the origin of species, or when analogous views are generally admitted, we can dimly forsee that there will be a considerable revolution in natural history. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Ernst W. Mayr: I published that theory [of speciational evolution] in a 1954 paper ... and I clearly I published that theory [of speciational evolution] in a 1954 paper ... and I clearly related it to paleontology. Darwin argued that the fossil record is very incomplete because some species fossilize better than others ... I noted that you are never going to find evidence of a small local population that changed very rapidly in the fossil record ... Gould was my course assistant at Harvard where I presented this theory again and again for three years. So he knew it thoroughly. So did Eldredge. In fact, in his 1971 paper Eldredge credited me with it. But that was lost over time. — Ernst W. Mayr
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: The several difficulties here discussed, namely our not finding in the successive formations infinitely numerous The several difficulties here discussed, namely our not finding in the successive formations infinitely numerous transitional links between the many species which now exist or have existed; the sudden manner in which whole groups of species appear in our European formations; the almost entire absence, as at present known, of fossiliferous formations beneath the Silurian strata, are all undoubtedly of the gravest nature. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: Nevertheless so profound is our ignorance, and so high our presumption, that we marvel when Nevertheless so profound is our ignorance, and so high our presumption, that we marvel when we hear of the extinction of an organic being; and as we do not see the cause, we invoke cataclysms to desolate the world, or invent laws on the duration of the forms of life! — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: As the species of the same genus usually have, though by no means invariably, much As the species of the same genus usually have, though by no means invariably, much similarity in habits and constitution, and always in structure, the struggle will generally be more severe between them, if they come into competition with each other, than between the species of distinct genera. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: I think it inevitably follows, that as new species in the course of time are I think it inevitably follows, that as new species in the course of time are formed through natural selection, others will become rarer and rarer, and finally extinct. The forms which stand in closest competition with those undergoing modification and improvement will naturally suffer most. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: It occurred to me, in 1837, that something might perhaps be made of this question It occurred to me, in 1837, that something might perhaps be made of this question (the origin of the species) by patiently accumulating and reflecting on all sorts of facts which could possibly have any bearing on it — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Friedrich Nietzsche: What surprises me most when surveying the great destinies of man is always seeing before What surprises me most when surveying the great destinies of man is always seeing before me the opposite of what Darwin and his school see or want to see today: selection in favor of the stronger, in favor of those who have come off better, the progress of the species. The very opposite is quite palpably the case: the elimination of the strokes of luck, the uselessness of the better-constituted types, the inevitable domination achieved by the average, even below-average types. — Friedrich Nietzsche
Darwin Species Sayings By Thomas Henry Huxley: That which struck the present writer most forcibly on his first perusal of the 'Origin That which struck the present writer most forcibly on his first perusal of the 'Origin of Species' was the conviction that Teleology, as commonly understood, had received its deathblow at Mr. Darwin's hands. For the teleological argument runs thus: an organ or organism (A) is precisely fitted to perform a function or purpose (B); therefore it was specially constructed to perform that function. — Thomas Henry Huxley
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: It was evident that such facts as these, as well as many others, could only It was evident that such facts as these, as well as many others, could only be explained on the supposition that species gradually become modified; and the subject haunted me. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By David Quammen: There's a voice that says: "So what?"It's not my voice, it's probably not yours, but There's a voice that says: "So what?"
It's not my voice, it's probably not yours, but it makes itself heard in the arenas of public opinion, querulous and smug and fortified by just a little knowledge, which as always is a dangerous thing. "So what if a bunch of species go extinct?" It says. "Extinction is a natural process. Darwin himself said so, didn't he? Extinction is the complement of evolution, making room for new species to evolve. There have always been extinctions. So why worry about these extinctions currently being caused by humanity?" And there has always been a pilot light burning in your furnace. So why worry when your house is on fire? — David Quammen
Darwin Species Sayings By T.H. Janabi: All disciplines of science are built on the causality of the relationships governing related events. All disciplines of science are built on the causality of the relationships governing related events. Yet the theory of evolution is built upon the idea of accidental changes that resulted in complex living systems. I was unable to comprehend how the notion that an infinite number of random accidents systematically happened to produce living species, and kept improving these beings, is justified. — T.H. Janabi
Darwin Species Sayings By Richard Dawkins: As Darwin himself was at pains to point out, natural selection is all about differential As Darwin himself was at pains to point out, natural selection is all about differential survival within species, not between them. — Richard Dawkins
Darwin Species Sayings By Francis Galton: The publication in 1859 of the Origin of Species by Charles Darwin made a marked The publication in 1859 of the Origin of Species by Charles Darwin made a marked epoch in my own mental development, as it did in that of human thought generally. Its effect was to demolish a multitude of dogmatic barriers by a single stroke, and to arouse a spirit of rebellion against all ancient authorities whose positive and unauthenticated statements were contradicted by modern science. — Francis Galton
Darwin Species Sayings By George MacDonald Fraser: Elgin himself looked ten years younger, now that he'd cast the die, but I thought Elgin himself looked ten years younger, now that he'd cast the die, but I thought exuberance had got the better of him when he strode into the saloon later, threw The Origin of Species on the table and announced:
"It's very original, no doubt, but not for a hot evening. What I need is some trollop."
I couldn't believe my ears, and him a church-goer, too. "Well, my lord, I dunno," says I. "Tientsin ain't much of a place, but I'll see what I can drum up - "
"Michel's been reading Doctor Thorne since Taku," cried he. "He must have finished it by now, surely! Ask him, Flashman, will you?" So I did, and had my ignorance, enlightened. — George MacDonald Fraser
Darwin Species Sayings By Stephen Baxter: I quoted to him what I remembered of Charles Darwin: "'Judging by the past, we I quoted to him what I remembered of Charles Darwin: "'Judging by the past, we may safely infer that not one living species will transmit its unaltered likeness to a distant futurity ... '"
"Darwin was right," Nebogipfel said gently. — Stephen Baxter
Darwin Species Sayings By Peter Singer: With the eventual acceptance of Darwin's theory we reach a modern understanding of nature, one With the eventual acceptance of Darwin's theory we reach a modern understanding of nature, one which has since then changed in detail rather than in fundamentals. Only those who prefer religious faith to beliefs based on reasoning and evidence can still maintain that the human species is the special darling of the entire universe, or that other animals were created to provide us with food, or that we have divine authority over them, and divine permission to kill them. — Peter Singer
Darwin Species Sayings By Jon Morrison: Universally accepted, microevolution has limits for what it can explain. These limits do not reach Universally accepted, microevolution has limits for what it can explain. These limits do not reach the center where the controversy lies - the Thesis of Common Ancestry was popularized by Charles Darwin. Darwin believed that the world we see today has come to us through an evolutionary process called natural selection. Through genetic mutation, species adapt and develop because the strongest of a species will survive and pass on their DNA to their successors. Macroevolution is the belief that all development - from the first moments of the universe, the formation of stars and planets, to the eventual emergence of simple bacteria, to the most complex human being is explainable through this naturalistic transformational process. — Jon Morrison
Darwin Species Sayings By Denis O'Hare: I read five books on the Constitution. My favorite was 'Plain, Honest Men' by Richard I read five books on the Constitution. My favorite was 'Plain, Honest Men' by Richard Beeman. I went on a science jag in the same way. I kept getting in arguments about evolution and being bested. So I read Charles Darwin's 'On the Origin of the Species,' a fantastic book that is not that difficult. — Denis O'Hare
Darwin Species Sayings By Scott F. Gilbert: Genetics might be adequate for explaining microevolution, but microevolutionary changes in gene frequency were not Genetics might be adequate for explaining microevolution, but microevolutionary changes in gene frequency were not seen as able to turn a reptile into a mammal or to convert a fish into an amphibian. Microevolution looks at adaptations that concern the survival of the fittest, not the arrival of the fittest ... The origin of species - Darwin's problem - remains unsolved. — Scott F. Gilbert
Darwin Species Sayings By Eddie Izzard: Mr. Charles Darwin, who looked a bit like God which is interesting, wrote a book Mr. Charles Darwin, who looked a bit like God which is interesting, wrote a book called You're a Fucking Monkey, Mate. He played around with the title for a while: We're All Fucking Monkeys; You're a Fucking Monkey, Mate; Get Out of My Face, You Fucking Monkey. And he ended up with On The Origin of Species. — Eddie Izzard
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: I am actually weary of telling people that I do not pretend to adduce [direct] I am actually weary of telling people that I do not pretend to adduce [direct] evidence of one species changing into another, but I believe that this view is in the main correct, because so many phenomena can thus be grouped end explained. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Richard Goldschmidt: It is good to keep in mind ... that nobody has ever succeeded in producing It is good to keep in mind ... that nobody has ever succeeded in producing even one new species by the accumulation of micromutations. Darwin's theory of natural selection has never had any proof, yet it has been universally accepted. — Richard Goldschmidt
Darwin Species Sayings By Rachel Carson: The wide-ranging birds that visit islands of the ocean in migration may also have a The wide-ranging birds that visit islands of the ocean in migration may also have a good deal to do with the distribution of plants, and perhaps even of some insects and minute land shells. From a ball of mud taken from a bird's plumage, Charles Darwin raised 82 separate plants, belonging to 5 distinct species! Many plant seeds have hooks or prickles, ideal for attachment to feathers. Such birds as the Pacific golden plover, which annually flies from the mainland of Alaska to the Hawaiian Islands and even beyond, probably figure in many riddles of plant distribution. — Rachel Carson
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: Who can explain why one species ranges widely and is very numerous, and why another Who can explain why one species ranges widely and is very numerous, and why another allied species has a narrow range and is rare? Yet these relations are of the highest importance, for they determine the present welfare, and, as I believe, the future success and modification of every inhabitant of this world. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: I can entertain no doubt, after the most deliberate study and dispassionate judgment of which I can entertain no doubt, after the most deliberate study and dispassionate judgment of which I am capable, that the view which most naturalists entertain, and which I formerly entertained - namely, that each species has been independently created - is erroneous. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Neil DeGrasse Tyson: Darwin's theory of evolution is a framework by which we understand the diversity of life Darwin's theory of evolution is a framework by which we understand the diversity of life on Earth. But there is no equation sitting there in Darwin's 'Origin of Species' that you apply and say, 'What is this species going to look like in 100 years or 1,000 years?' Biology isn't there yet with that kind of predictive precision. — Neil DeGrasse Tyson
Darwin Species Sayings By Joseph Dalton Hooker: I am above the forest region, amongst grand rocks & such a torrent as you I am above the forest region, amongst grand rocks & such a torrent as you see in Salvator Rosa's paintings vegetation all a scrub of rhodos. with Pines below me as thick & bad to get through as our Fuegian Fagi on the hill tops, & except the towering peaks of P. S. [perpetual snow] that, here shoot up on all hands there is little difference in the mt scenery - here however the blaze of Rhod. flowers and various colored jungle proclaims a differently constituted region in a naturalist's eye & twenty species here, to one there, always are asking me the vexed question, where do we come from?
[Letter to Charles Darwin 24 Jun 1849] — Joseph Dalton Hooker
Darwin Species Sayings By Daniel Quinn: CONTRARY TO THE COMMON ASSUMPTION , Charles Darwin did not originate the idea of evolution. CONTRARY TO THE COMMON ASSUMPTION , Charles Darwin did not originate the idea of evolution. By the middle of the nineteenth century, the mere fact of evolution had been around for a long time, and most thinkers of the time were perfectly content to leave it at that. The absence of a theory to explain evolutionary change didn't trouble them, wasn't experienced as a pressure, as it was by Darwin. He knew there had to be some intelligible mechanism or dynamic that would account for it, and this is what he went looking for - with well-known results. In his Origin of Species, he wasn't announcing the fact of evolution, he was trying to make sense of that fact. — Daniel Quinn
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: It has already been stated that various parts in the same individual, which are exactly It has already been stated that various parts in the same individual, which are exactly alike during an early embryonic period, become widely different and serve for widely different purposes in the adult state. So again it has been shown that generally the embryos of the most distinct species belonging to the same class are closely similar, but become, when fully developed, widely dissimilar. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: Seeing this gradation and diversity of structure in one small, intimately related group of birds, Seeing this gradation and diversity of structure in one small, intimately related group of birds, one might really fancy that from an original paucity of birds in this archipelago, one species had been taken and modified for different ends. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: I do not believe, as we shall presently see, that all our dogs have descended I do not believe, as we shall presently see, that all our dogs have descended from any one wild species; but, in the case of some other domestic races, there is presumptive, or even strong, evidence in favour of this view. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Jerry A. Coyne: As Darwin noted, "It is certain that with almost all animals there is a struggle As Darwin noted, "It is certain that with almost all animals there is a struggle between the males for the possession of the female." When males of a species battle it out directly, be it through the clashing antlers of deer, the stabbing horns of the stag beetle, the head butting of stalk-eyed flies, or the bloody battles of massive elephant seals, they win access to females by driving off competitors. Selection will favor any trait that promotes such victories so long as the increased chance of getting mates more than offsets any reduced survival. This kind of selection produces armaments: stronger weapons, larger body size, or anything that helps a male win physical contests. — Jerry A. Coyne
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: The formation of different languages and of distinct species and the proofs that both have The formation of different languages and of distinct species and the proofs that both have been developed through a gradual process, are curiously parallel. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Salman Rushdie: In the absence of the great majority of guests, all manner of rumors came into In the absence of the great majority of guests, all manner of rumors came into the Shalimar Bagh, hooded and cloaked to shield themselves against the elements, and filled the empty places around the dastarkhans: cheap rumors from the gutter as well as fancy rumors claiming aristocratic parentage - an entire social hierarchy of rumor lounged against the bolsters, created by the mystery that enveloped everything like the blizzard. The rumors were veiled, shadowy, unclear, argumentative, often malicious. They seemed like a new species of living thing, and evolved according to the laws laid down by Darwin, mutating randomly and being subjected to the amoral winnowing processes of natural selection. The — Salman Rushdie
Darwin Species Sayings By John Elkann: I am a big believer of what Darwin discovered in the Galapagos, proving that the I am a big believer of what Darwin discovered in the Galapagos, proving that the species most responsive to change will survive over apparently stronger or more intelligent competitors. — John Elkann
Darwin Species Sayings By Charles Darwin: I am aware that the conclusions arrived at in this work will be denounced by I am aware that the conclusions arrived at in this work will be denounced by some as highly irreligious; but he who denounces them is bound to show why it is more irreligious to explain the origin of man as a distinct species by descent from some lower from, through the laws of variation and natural selection, than to explain the birth of the individual through the laws of ordinary reproduction. The birth both of the species and of the individual are equally parts of that grand sequence of events, which our minds refuse to accept as the result of blind chance. — Charles Darwin
Darwin Species Sayings By Ursula K. Le Guin: The law of evolution is that the strongest survives!' 'Yes, and the strongest, in the The law of evolution is that the strongest survives!' 'Yes, and the strongest, in the existence of any social species, are those who are most social. In human terms, most ethical ... There is no strength to be gained from hurting one another. Only weakness. — Ursula K. Le Guin