Distemper'd Famous Quotes & Sayings

33 Distemper'd Famous Sayings, Quotes and Quotation.

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Antonio: Will you stay no longer? nor will you not that I go with you?
Sebastian: By your patience, no. My stars shine darkly over me; the malignancy of my fate might, perhaps, distemper yours; therefore I shall crave of you your leave that I may bear my evils alone. It were a bad recompense for your love to lay any of them on you.
William Shakespeare Distemper'd Sayings By William Shakespeare: Antonio: Will you stay no longer? nor will you not that I go with you?
Or she would look at him with a sullen expression, once again he would see before him a face worthy of figuring in Botticelli's Life of Moses, he would place her in it, he would give her neck the necessary inclination; and when he had well and truly painted her in distemper, in the fifteenth century, on the wall of the Sistine Chapel, the idea that she had nevertheless remained here, by the piano, in the present moment, ready to be kissed and possessed, the idea of her materiality and her life would intoxicate him with such force that, his eyes distracted, his jaw tensed as though to devour her, he would swoop down upon that Botticelli virgin and begin pinching her cheeks.Marcel Proust Distemper'd Sayings By Marcel Proust: Or she would look at him with a sullen expression, once again he would see
By faith ponder on this, that though thou art no way able in or by thyself to get the conquest over thy distemper, though thou art even weary of contending, and art utterly ready to faint, yet that there is enough in Jesus Christ to yield thee relief ...John Owen Distemper'd Sayings By John Owen: By faith ponder on this, that though thou art no way able in or by
It was her clothes that did it...they clashed violently with the buff distemper of the walls.Norman Collins Distemper'd Sayings By Norman Collins: It was her clothes that did it...they clashed violently with the buff distemper of the
The great mother whom we call Innana gave a gift to woman that is not known among men, and this is the secret of blood. The flow at the dark of the moon, the healing blood of the moon's birth - to men, this is flux and distemper, bother and pain. They imagine we suffer and consider themselves lucky. We do not disabuse them.
In the red tent, the truth is known. In the red tent, where days pass like a gentle stream, as the gift of Innana courses through us, cleansing the body of last month's death, preparing the body to receive the new month's life, women give thanks - for repose and restoration, for the knowledge that life comes from between our legs, and that life costs blood.
Anita Diamant Distemper'd Sayings By Anita Diamant: The great mother whom we call Innana gave a gift to woman that is not
Criticism may not be agreeable, but it is necessary. It fulfils the same function as pain in the human body; it calls attention to the development of an unhealthy state of things. If it is heeded in time, danger may be averted; if it is suppressed, a fatal distemper may develop.
[New Statesman interview, 7 January 1939]
Winston S. Churchill Distemper'd Sayings By Winston S. Churchill: Criticism may not be agreeable, but it is necessary. It fulfils the same function as
As for women that do not think their own safety worth their thought, that impatient of their present state, resolve as they call it to take the first good Christian that comes; that runs into matrimony, as a horse rushes into battle; I can say nothing to them, but this, that they are a sort of ladies that are to be pray'd for among the rest of distemper'd people; and to me they look like people that venture their whole estates in a lottery where there is a hundred thousand blanks to one prize.Daniel Defoe Distemper'd Sayings By Daniel Defoe: As for women that do not think their own safety worth their thought, that impatient
Can you understand,' asked my father, 'the deep meaning of that weakness, that passion for colored tissue, for papier-mache, for distemper, for oakum and sawdust? This is,' he continued with a pained smile, 'the proof of our love for matter as such, for its fluffiness or porosity, for its unique mystical consistency. Demiurge, that great master and artist, made matter invisible, made it disappear under the surface of life. We, on the contrary, love its creaking, its resistance, its clumsiness. We like to see behind each gesture, behind each move, its inertia, its heavy effort, its bearlike awkwardness.Bruno Schulz Distemper'd Sayings By Bruno Schulz: Can you understand,' asked my father, 'the deep meaning of that weakness, that passion for
There are dull and bright, sacred and profane, coarse and fine egotists. It is a disease that, like influenza, falls on all constitutions. In the distemper known to physicians as chorea, the patient sometimes turns round, and continues to spin slowly in one spot. Is egotism a metaphysical varioloid of this malady?Ralph Waldo Emerson Distemper'd Sayings By Ralph Waldo Emerson: There are dull and bright, sacred and profane, coarse and fine egotists. It is a
A broken heart is a distemper which kills many more than is generally imagined, and would have a fair title to a place in the bills of mortality, did it not differ in one instance from all other diseases, namely, that no physicians can cure it.Henry Fielding Distemper'd Sayings By Henry Fielding: A broken heart is a distemper which kills many more than is generally imagined, and
Conservatism is less a set of ideas than it is a pathological distemper, a militant anger over the fact that the universe is not closed and life is not static.Bill Moyers Distemper'd Sayings By Bill Moyers: Conservatism is less a set of ideas than it is a pathological distemper, a militant
[To] turn poet, they say, is an infectious and incurable distemper.Miguel De Cervantes Distemper'd Sayings By Miguel De Cervantes: [To] turn poet, they say, is an infectious and incurable distemper.
If originally it was not good for a man to be alone, it is much worse for a sick man to be so; he thinks too much of his distemper, and magnifies it.Lord Chesterfield Distemper'd Sayings By Lord Chesterfield: If originally it was not good for a man to be alone, it is much
Don't go to the doctor with every distemper, nor to the lawyer with every quarrel, nor to the pot for every thirst.Benjamin Franklin Distemper'd Sayings By Benjamin Franklin: Don't go to the doctor with every distemper, nor to the lawyer with every quarrel,
The malignancy of my fate might perhaps distemper yours. Therefore I shall crave of you your leave that I may bear my evils alone. ItWilliam Shakespeare Distemper'd Sayings By William Shakespeare: The malignancy of my fate might perhaps distemper yours. Therefore I shall crave of you
If little faults, proceeding on distemper, Shall not be wink'd at, how shall we stretch our eye When capital crimes, chew'd, swallow'd and digested, Appear beforeWilliam Shakespeare Distemper'd Sayings By William Shakespeare: If little faults, proceeding on distemper, Shall not be wink'd at, how shall we stretch
AT the slight creaking made by Macmaster in pushing open his door, Tietjens started violently. He was sitting in a smoking-jacket, playing patience engrossedly in a sort of garret bedroom. It had a sloping roof outlined by black oak beams, which cut into squares the cream-coloured patent distemper of the walls.Ford Madox Ford Distemper'd Sayings By Ford Madox Ford: AT the slight creaking made by Macmaster in pushing open his door, Tietjens started violently.
Of no distemper, of no blast he died,
But fell like autumn fruit that mellowed long
Even wondered at, because he dropped no sooner.
Fate seemed to wind him up for fourscore years,
Yet freshly ran he on ten winters more;
Till like a clock worn out with eating time,
The wheels of weary life at last stood still.
John Dryden Distemper'd Sayings By John Dryden: Of no distemper, of no blast he died, But fell like autumn fruit that mellowed
Enthusiasm - a distemper of youth, curable by small doses of repentance in connection with outward applications of experience.Ambrose Bierce Distemper'd Sayings By Ambrose Bierce: Enthusiasm - a distemper of youth, curable by small doses of repentance in connection with
So now I lye by Day and toss or rave by Night, since the ratling and perpetual Hum of the Town deny me rest: just as Madness and Phrensy are the vapours which rise from the lower Faculties, so the Chaos of the Streets reaches up even to the very Closet here and I am whirl'd about by cries of Knives to Grind and Here are your Mouse-Traps. I was last night about to enter the Shaddowe of Rest when a Watch-man, half-drunken, thumps at the Door with his Past Three-a-clock and his Rainy Wet Morning. And when at length I slipp'd into Sleep I had no sooner forgot my present Distemper than I was plunged into a worse: I dreamd my self to be lying in a small place under ground, like unto a Grave, and my Body was all broken while others sung. And there was a Face that did so terrifie me that I had like to have expired in my Dream. Well, I will say no more.Peter Ackroyd Distemper'd Sayings By Peter Ackroyd: So now I lye by Day and toss or rave by Night, since the ratling
O gentle son, / Upon the heat and flame of thy distemper, sprinkle cool patience.William Shakespeare Distemper'd Sayings By William Shakespeare: O gentle son, / Upon the heat and flame of thy distemper, sprinkle cool patience.
There are those who say further that these are meer Dreames and no true Relations, but I say back to them: look upon my Churches in the Spittle-fields, in Limehouse, and now in the Parish of Wapping Stepney, and do you not wonder why they lead you into a darker World which on Reflection you know to be your own? Every Patch of Ground by them has its Hypochondriack Distemper and Disorder; every Stone of them bears the marks of Scorching by which you may follow the true Path of God.Peter Ackroyd Distemper'd Sayings By Peter Ackroyd: There are those who say further that these are meer Dreames and no true Relations,
The distemper of which, as a community, we are sick, should be considered rather as a moral than a political malady.William Wilberforce Distemper'd Sayings By William Wilberforce: The distemper of which, as a community, we are sick, should be considered rather as
All I can say, in answer to this kind queries [of friends] is that I have not the distemper called the Plague; but that I have allthe plagues of old age, and of a shattered carcase.Lord Chesterfield Distemper'd Sayings By Lord Chesterfield: All I can say, in answer to this kind queries [of friends] is that I
When Rosencrantz asks Hamlet, "Good my lord, what is your cause of distemper? You do surely bar the door upon your own liberty, if you deny your grief to your friends"(III, ii, 844-846), Hamlet responds, "Why, look you now, how unworthy a thing you make of me! You would play upon me; you would seem to know my stops; you would pluck from my lowest note to the top of my compass; and there is much music, excellent voice, in this little organ, yet cannot you make it speak. 'Sblood, do you think I am easier to be played on than a pipe? Call me what instrument you will, though you can fret me, you cannot play upon me." (III,ii, 371-380)William Shakespeare Distemper'd Sayings By William Shakespeare: When Rosencrantz asks Hamlet, "Good my lord, what is your cause of distemper? You do
I am patriot enough to take pains to bring this usefull invention into fashion in England, and I should not fail to write to some of our Doctors very particularly about it, if I knew anyone of 'em that I thought had Virtue enough to destroy such a considerable branch of Revenue for the good of Mankind, but that Distemper is too beneficial to them not to expose to all their Resentment the hardy wight that should undertake to put an end to it.Mary Wortley Montagu Distemper'd Sayings By Mary Wortley Montagu: I am patriot enough to take pains to bring this usefull invention into fashion in
Hunger does not breed reform; it breeds madness and all the distemper's that make an ordered life impossible.Woodrow Wilson Distemper'd Sayings By Woodrow Wilson: Hunger does not breed reform; it breeds madness and all the distemper's that make an
Of all the difficulties in a state, the temper of a true government most felicifies and perpetuates it; too sudden alterations distemper it. Had Nero tuned his kingdom as he did his harp, his harmony had been more honorable, and his reign more prosperous.Francis Quarles Distemper'd Sayings By Francis Quarles: Of all the difficulties in a state, the temper of a true government most felicifies
Everyone in our culture wants to win a prize. Perhaps that is the grand lesson we have taken with us from kindergarten in the age of perversions of Dewey-style education: everyone gets a ribbon, and praise becomes a meaningless narcotic to soothe egoistic distemper.Gerald Early Distemper'd Sayings By Gerald Early: Everyone in our culture wants to win a prize. Perhaps that is the grand lesson
Love is like a diamond; for as a diamond is beautiful to look upon, so is love fair, but as the diamond is poison to any one who swallows it, in the same manner love is a kind of poison and produces a baneful raging distemper in those who are infected by it.Jens Peter Jacobsen Distemper'd Sayings By Jens Peter Jacobsen: Love is like a diamond; for as a diamond is beautiful to look upon, so
Oppression makes wise men mad; but the distemper is still the madness of the wise, which is better than the sobriety of fools.Edmund Burke Distemper'd Sayings By Edmund Burke: Oppression makes wise men mad; but the distemper is still the madness of the wise,
A Parliament is that to the Commonwealth which the soul is to the body. It behoves us therefore to keep the facility of that soul from distemper.John Pym Distemper'd Sayings By John Pym: A Parliament is that to the Commonwealth which the soul is to the body. It
It is an aphorism in physic, that unwholesome airs, because perpetually sucked into the lungs, do distemper health more than coarser diet used but at set times. The like may be said of society, which, if good, is a better refiner of the spirits than ordinary books.Frances Osborne Distemper'd Sayings By Frances Osborne: It is an aphorism in physic, that unwholesome airs, because perpetually sucked into the lungs,