Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Famous Quotes & Sayings

32 Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Famous Sayings, Quotes and Quotation.

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A few of the guests, who had the misfortune of being too near the windows, were seized and feasted on at once. When Elizabeth stood, she saw Mrs. Long struggle to free herself as two female dreadfuls bit into her head, cracking her skull like a walnut, and sending a shower of dark blood spouting as high as the chandeliers.
As guests fled in every direction, Mr. Bennet's voice cut through the commotion. "Girls! Pentagram of Death!"
Elizabeth immediately joined her four sisters, Jane, Mary, Catherine, and Lydia in the center of the dance floor. Each girl produced a dagger from her ankle and stood at the tip of an imaginary five-pointed star. From the center of the room, they began stepping outward in unison - each thrusting a razor-sharp dagger with one hand, the other hand modestly tucked into the small of her back.
Seth Grahame-Smith Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Seth Grahame-Smith: A few of the guests, who had the misfortune of being too near the windows,
It is always easy to question the judgement of others in matters of which we may be imperfectly informed.P.D. James Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By P.D. James: It is always easy to question the judgement of others in matters of which we
There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me.Jane Austen Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Jane Austen: There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the
I wonder who first discovered the efficacy of poetry in driving away love!- Elizabeth BennetJane Austen Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Jane Austen: I wonder who first discovered the efficacy of poetry in driving away love!- Elizabeth Bennet
And with regard to the resentment of his family, or the indignation of the world, if the former were excited by his marrying me, it would not give me one moment's concern
and the world in general would have too much sense to join in the scorn.
Jane Austen Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Jane Austen: And with regard to the resentment of his family, or the indignation of the world,
My object then," replied Darcy, "was to show you, by every civility in my power, that I was not so mean as to resent the past; and I hoped to obtain your forgiveness, to lessen your ill opinion, by letting you see that your reproofs had been attended to. How soon any other wishes introduced themselves I can hardly tell, but I believe in about half an hour after I had seen you.Jane Austen Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Jane Austen: My object then," replied Darcy, "was to show you, by every civility in my power,
I am excessively diverted.Jane Austen Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Jane Austen: I am excessively diverted.
I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine.Jane Austen Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Jane Austen: I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine.
Walking across the moors made me feel as if I'd stepped primly out of a Jane Austen book or an Impressionist painting. But I bet even Elizabeth Bennet had never punted a rabbit before, and my current count was 137.Delilah S. Dawson Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Delilah S. Dawson: Walking across the moors made me feel as if I'd stepped primly out of a
You may ask questions which I shall not choose to answer.Jane Austen Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Jane Austen: You may ask questions which I shall not choose to answer.
Elizabeth was excessively disappointed ... but it was her business to be satisfied - and certainly her temper to be happy; and all was soon right again.Jane Austen Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Jane Austen: Elizabeth was excessively disappointed ... but it was her business to be satisfied - and
She was convinced that she could have been happy with him, when it was no longer likely they should meet.Jane Austen Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Jane Austen: She was convinced that she could have been happy with him, when it was no
They parted at last with mutual civility, and possibly a mutual desire of never meeting again.Jane Austen Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Jane Austen: They parted at last with mutual civility, and possibly a mutual desire of never meeting
As for Elizabeth Bennet, our chief reason for accepting her point of view as a reflection of her author's is the impression that she bears of sympathy between them
an impression of which almost every reader would be sensible, even if it had not the explicit confirmation of Jane Austen's letters. Yet, as she is presented to us in Pride and Prejudice, she is but a partial and sometimes perverse observer.
Mary Lascelles Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Mary Lascelles: As for Elizabeth Bennet, our chief reason for accepting her point of view as a
Elizabeth Bennet: And that put paid to it. I wonder who first discovered the power of poetry in driving away love?
Mr. Darcy: I thought that poetry was the food of love.
Elizabeth Bennet: Of a fine stout love, it may. But if it is only a vague inclination I'm convinced one poor sonnet will kill it stone dead
Mr. Darcy: So what do you recommend to encourage affection?
Elizabeth Bennet: Dancing. Even if one's partner is barely tolerable.
Jane Austen Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Jane Austen: Elizabeth Bennet: And that put paid to it. I wonder who first discovered the power
What was she to think? Oh, teasing, teasing man! It would be so much easier if he could simply tell her what he meant by all his confusing actions. And so she had another shock: Jane Bennet was irritated with Mr. Bingley.Elizabeth Adams Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Elizabeth Adams: What was she to think? Oh, teasing, teasing man! It would be so much easier
Vanity, not love, has been my folly.Jane Austen Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Jane Austen: Vanity, not love, has been my folly.
You are mistaken, Mr. Darcy, if you suppose that the mode of your declaration affected me in any other way, than as it spared the concern which I might have felt in refusing you, had you behaved in a more gentlemanlike manner. (Elizabeth Bennett)Jane Austen Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Jane Austen: You are mistaken, Mr. Darcy, if you suppose that the mode of your declaration affected
Discussing the character of Elizabeth Bennet in Pride and Prejudice is a matter of content (of 'what?'), whereas examining Jane Austen's techniques of characterisation is a question of form (or 'how?'). Some may find these fine distinctions scholastic, but then some find any fine distinctions scholastic.Terry Eagleton Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Terry Eagleton: Discussing the character of Elizabeth Bennet in Pride and Prejudice is a matter of content
You judge very properly," said Mr. Bennet, "and it is happy for you that you possess the talent of flattering with delicacy. May I ask whether these pleasing attentions proceed from the impulse of the moment, or are the result of previous study?"
"They arise chiefly from what is passing at the time, and thought I sometimes amuse myself with suggesting and arranging such little elegant compliments as may be adapted to ordinary occasions, I always wish to give them as unstudied an air as possible."
Mr. Bennet's expectations were fully answered. His cousin was as absurd as he had hoped, and he listened with the keenest enjoyment, maintaining at the same time the most resolute composure of countenance, and except in an occasional glance at Elizabeth, requiring no partner in his pleasure.
Jane Austen Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Jane Austen: You judge very properly," said Mr. Bennet, "and it is happy for you that you
Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can.Jane Austen Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Jane Austen: Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at
My dear, dear aunt,' she rapturously cried, what delight! what felicity! You give me fresh life and vigour. Adieu to disappointment and spleen. What are men to rocks and mountains? Oh! what hours of transport we shall spend! And when we do return, it shall not be like other travellers, without being able to give one accurate idea of any thing. We will know where we have gone
we will recollect what we have seen. Lakes, mountains, and rivers shall not be jumbled together in our imaginations; nor, when we attempt to describe any particular scene, will we begin quarrelling about its relative situation. Let our first effusions be less insupportable than those of the generality of travellers.
Jane Austen Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Jane Austen: My dear, dear aunt,' she rapturously cried, what delight! what felicity! You give me fresh
What on earth did you say to Isola? She stopped in on her way to pick up Pride and Prejudice and to berate me for never telling her about Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy. Why hadn't she known there were better love stories around? Stories not riddled with ill-adjusted men, anguish, death and graveyards!Mary Ann Shaffer Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Mary Ann Shaffer: What on earth did you say to Isola? She stopped in on her way to
Well, my dear," said Mr. Bennet, when Elizabeth had read the note aloud, "if your daughter should have a dangerous fit of illness - if she should die, it would be a comfort to know that it was all in pursuit of Mr. Bingley, and under your orders.Jane Austen Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Jane Austen: Well, my dear," said Mr. Bennet, when Elizabeth had read the note aloud, "if your
There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.Jane Austen Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Jane Austen: There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think
Elizabeth Bennet: I'm very fond of walking. Mr. Darcy: Yes... yes I know. (from Pride & Prejudice, the movie)Jane Austen Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Jane Austen: Elizabeth Bennet: I'm very fond of walking. Mr. Darcy: Yes... yes I know. (from Pride
Have you any other objection than your belief of my indifference?
- Elizabeth Bennet
Jane Austen Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Jane Austen: Have you any other objection than your belief of my indifference?- Elizabeth Bennet
It was gratitude; gratitude, not merely for having once loved her, but for loving her still well enough to forgive all the petulance and acrimony of her manner in rejecting him, and all the unjust accusations accompanying her rejection.Jane Austen Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Jane Austen: It was gratitude; gratitude, not merely for having once loved her, but for loving her
Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice should create in the discerning male reader a deeply rooted concupiscence for Elizabeth Bennet that springs not from her vivacity or from her wit but from her unerring instinct to follow the deeply moral directives of her own character even against the influences and arguments of society, of convention, of seeming necessity, and of her friends and family. Properly read, Austen should be a form of pornography for the morally and spiritually discriminating man.Gerald Weaver Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Gerald Weaver: Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice should create in the discerning male reader a deeply rooted
Let's make a game of it, shall we?" she said. "Whoever kills the most, wins."
"I will kill twenty!" Lydia declared.
"I will kill thirty!" Kitty countered.
Mary paused for a moment of sober calculation.
"I will kill thirty-two." she said.
"I will kill as long as I must," said Jane.
"And I will kill as long as I can," said Elizabeth
Steve Hockensmith Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Steve Hockensmith: Let's make a game of it, shall we?" she said. "Whoever kills the most, wins."
Yes, you know enough of my frankness to believe me capable of that. After abusing you so abominably to your face, I could have no scruple in abusing you to all your relations.
-Elizabeth Bennet
Jane Austen Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Jane Austen: Yes, you know enough of my frankness to believe me capable of that. After abusing
She began now to comprehend that he was exactly the man who, in disposition and talents, would most suit her. His understanding and temper, though unlike her own, would have answered all her wishes. It was an union that must have been to the advantage of both: by her ease and liveliness, his mind might have been softened, his manners improved; and from his judgement, information, and knowledge of the world, she must have received benefit of greater importance.Jane Austen Elizabeth And Jane Bennet Sayings By Jane Austen: She began now to comprehend that he was exactly the man who, in disposition and