English London Famous Quotes & Sayings

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100 English London Famous Sayings, Quotes and Quotation.

English London Sayings By William Monahan: I write drama in the English language. If I wasn't working in London I'd be I write drama in the English language. If I wasn't working in London I'd be doing something wrong. — William Monahan
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English London Sayings By Malcolm X: Not long ago, an English writer telephoned me from London, asking questions. One was "What's Not long ago, an English writer telephoned me from London, asking questions. One was "What's your alma mater?" I told him, "Books." You will never catch me with a free fifteen minutes in which I'm not studying something I feel might be able to help the black man. — Malcolm X
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English London Sayings By Graydon Carter: There is a certain ancient civility about tailors that is welcome - especially in modern There is a certain ancient civility about tailors that is welcome - especially in modern London, which is now very much an international city, not an English city. They're still a little vessel of Englishness in what is otherwise a pretty rambunctious place. — Graydon Carter
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English London Sayings By Chuck Palahniuk: Anyone who's ever flown London to Sydney, seated next to or anywhere in the proximity Anyone who's ever flown London to Sydney, seated next to or anywhere in the proximity of a fussy baby, you'll no doubt fall right into the swing of things in Hell. What with the strangers and crowding and seemingly endless hours of waiting for nothing to happen, for you Hell will feel like one long, nostalgic hit a deja vu. Especially if your in-flight movie was The English Patient. In Hell, whenever the demons announce they're going to treat everyone to a big-name Hollywood movie, don't get too excited because it's always The English Patient, or, unfortunately, The Piano. It's never The Breakfast Club. — Chuck Palahniuk
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English London Sayings By Monica Bellucci: The first time I was in London, I went to an English greasy spoon to The first time I was in London, I went to an English greasy spoon to get some breakfast and realised that all the waiters were speaking Italian. That's when it hit me what an international city this is. — Monica Bellucci
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English London Sayings By Salman Rushdie: In writing 'The Satanic Verses,' I think I was writing for the first time from In writing 'The Satanic Verses,' I think I was writing for the first time from the whole of myself. The English part, the Indian part. The part of me that loves London, and the part that longs for Bombay. And at my typewriter, alone, I could indulge this. — Salman Rushdie
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English London Sayings By Ananda K. Coomaraswamy: We find "Nirvana" rendered by "annihilation" (no one stops to ask of what?), though the We find "Nirvana" rendered by "annihilation" (no one stops to ask of what?), though the word means "despiration", as Meister Eckhart uses the term. I accuse the majority of Christian writers of a certain irresponsibility, or even levity, in their references to other religions. I should never dream of making use of a Gospel text without referring to the Greek, and considering also the earlier history of the Greek words employed, and I demand as much of Christian writers.
To THE NEW ENGLISH WEEKLY, LONDON - January 8, 1946 — Ananda K. Coomaraswamy
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English London Sayings By Mark Lamonica: The English were fascinated with the Italian people and their amazing Epicurean culture. Italian poetry, The English were fascinated with the Italian people and their amazing Epicurean culture. Italian poetry, painting, pornography, music, drama, fashion, wine, women, cheese, anything Italiano was a premium commodity in London during Shakespeare's day. — Mark Lamonica
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English London Sayings By Mickey Drexler: The British invented the classic look. Men's apparel was created in London, the great English The British invented the classic look. Men's apparel was created in London, the great English style. You have to respect this country's suits, shirts, shoes, luggage. — Mickey Drexler
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English London Sayings By J.I. Packer: Knowing about God is crucially important for the living of our lives. As it would Knowing about God is crucially important for the living of our lives. As it would be cruel to an Amazonian tribesmen to fly him to London, put him down without explanation in Trafalgar Square and leave him, as one who knew nothing of English or England, to fend for himself, so we are cruel to ourselves if we try to live in this world without knowing about the God whose world it is and who runs it .The world becomes a strange, mad, painful place, and life in it a disappointing and unpleasant business, for those who do not know about God. Disregard the study of God, and you sentence yourself to stumble and blunder through life blindfold, as it were , with no sense of direction, and no understanding of what surrounds you. This way you can waste your life and lose your soul. — J.I. Packer
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English London Sayings By Theresa May: You only have to look at London, where almost half of all primary school children You only have to look at London, where almost half of all primary school children speak English as a second language, to see the challenges we now face as a country. This isn't fair to anyone: how can people build relationships with their neighbours if they can't even speak the same language? — Theresa May
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English London Sayings By Rosie Thomas: She had an English boyfriend who called her more often than she needed to hear She had an English boyfriend who called her more often than she needed to hear from him, a savings account, a mobile phone, an Oyster Card, and a place to live that made her feel as if she was in a movie. She was a London girl. — Rosie Thomas
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English London Sayings By Ed Westwick: I'm a big fan of London in the summertime. English people are dependent on weather I'm a big fan of London in the summertime. English people are dependent on weather to change our attitudes, and, provided it's a decent summer, everyone's spirits are uplifted and the whole place is in bloom. It's a magical transformation. London in the summer, going to see bands play outside, watching football. — Ed Westwick
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English London Sayings By Hermann Goring: I considered the attacks on London useless, and I told the Fuhrer again and again I considered the attacks on London useless, and I told the Fuhrer again and again that inasmuch as I knew the English people as well as I did my own people, I could never force them to their knees by attacking London. We might be able to subdue the Dutch people by such measures but not the British. — Hermann Goring
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English London Sayings By Peter York: The old process of social assimilation used to be mainly about English new money - The old process of social assimilation used to be mainly about English new money - generated in London, the mucky, brassy North or the colonies - buying those houses and restoring them, and doing the three-generation thing, mouldering into the landscape, and the 'community,' identifying with the place in a familiar way. — Peter York
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English London Sayings By Neal Stephenson: And yet all the gold is in England, it is dug up from Portuguese and And yet all the gold is in England, it is dug up from Portuguese and Spanish mines, but it flows by some occult power of attraction to the Tower of London." "Flows," Caroline repeated. "Flows, like a current." Sophie nodded. "And the English have grown so used to this that they use 'currency' as a synonym for money, as if no distinction need be observed between them. — Neal Stephenson
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English London Sayings By Elena Roger: London has this culture of the theatre that is so big, it was a like London has this culture of the theatre that is so big, it was a like a dream - but I never had a thought to be able to play here because my English was not very good. So being given the opportunity to come work here was like a gift. — Elena Roger
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English London Sayings By Margaret George: In Lisbon, a street cry gloated over the Spanish defeat: Which ships got home? The In Lisbon, a street cry gloated over the Spanish defeat: Which ships got home? The ones the English missed. And where are the rest? The waves will tell you. What happened to them? It is said they are lost. Do we know their names? They know them in London. Oh, — Margaret George
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English London Sayings By Ed Westwick: I grew up in a middle class English family just outside London. I wasn't surrounded I grew up in a middle class English family just outside London. I wasn't surrounded by that speedy city lifestyle, it was a little mellower. — Ed Westwick
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English London Sayings By Kurt Weill: Yesterday a very interesting, beautifully photografed english picture about a nun convent in India, "Black Yesterday a very interesting, beautifully photografed english picture about a nun convent in India, "Black Narcissus," with Deborah Kerr who is quite lovely. They are away ahead of Hollywood, better ideas, better scripts, better color, and much better acting.

Kurt Weill, London, May 8, 1947 — Kurt Weill
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English London Sayings By Ronald Carter: The range and variety of Chaucer's English did much to establish English as a national The range and variety of Chaucer's English did much to establish English as a national language. Chaucer also contributed much to the formation of a standard English based on the dialect of the East Midlands region which was basically the dialect of London which Chaucer himself spoke. Indeed, by the end of the fourteenth century the educated language of London, bolstered by the economic power of London itself, was beginning to become the standard form of written language throughout the country, although the process was not to be completed for several centuries. The cultural, commercial, administrative and intellectual importance of the East Midlands (one of the two main universities, Cambridge, was also in this region), the agricultural richness of the region and the presence of major cities, Norwich and London, contributed much to the increasing standardisation of the dialect. — Ronald Carter
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English London Sayings By Satya Bhabha: Before doing 'Midnight's Children,' I didn't really have a chance to explore my Indian side. Before doing 'Midnight's Children,' I didn't really have a chance to explore my Indian side. The Indian side of my heritage was always present, but it did not particularly define my identity. Being English was more an identity-defining status. I was born and brought up in London. Yes, my father is Parsi. — Satya Bhabha
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English London Sayings By Jed Jurchenko: In his book, Knowing God, J.I. Packer paints a brilliant picture of the value of In his book, Knowing God, J.I. Packer paints a brilliant picture of the value of Scripture stating, "As it would be cruel to an Amazonian tribesman to fly him to London, put him down without explanation in Trafalgar Square and leave him, as one who knew nothing of English or England, to fend for himself, so we are cruel to ourselves if we try to live in this world without knowing about the God whose world it is and who runs it."3 — Jed Jurchenko
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English London Sayings By Helene Hanff: Please write and tell me about London, I live for the day when I step Please write and tell me about London, I live for the day when I step off the boat-train and feel its dirty sidewalks under my feet. I want to walk up Berkeley Square and down Wimpole Street and stand in St.Paul's where John Donne preached and sit on the step Elizabeth sat on when she refused to enter the Tower, and like that. A newspaper man I know, who was stationed in London during the war, says tourists go to England with preconceived notions, so they always find exactly what they go looking for. I told him I'd go looking for the England of English literature, and he said:
Then it's there. — Helene Hanff
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English London Sayings By Albert J. Lubin: It was a clear autumn day Sunday in 1876; Vincent van Gogh, twenty-three years old, It was a clear autumn day Sunday in 1876; Vincent van Gogh, twenty-three years old, left the English boarding school where he was teaching to give a sermon at a small Methodist church in Richmond, a humble London suburb. Standing in front of the lectern, he felt like a lost soul emerging from the dark cave in which he had been buried.

The sermon, which survives among Vincent's collected letters, reiterates universal ideas and is not an outstanding example of the art of homiletics. Nevertheless, his words grew out of his tormented life and had an intense emotional charge. Preaching to the congregation, he was also preaching to himself -- and of himself. The images he used were the same as those that were to be given powerful expression in his pictures.

The text chosen for the sermon was Psalm 119:19, 'I am a stranger on the earth, hide not Thy commandments from me.' — Albert J. Lubin
English London Sayings By Jack London: Ketch all alone with a black crew from Malaita. And Romance lured and beckoned before Ketch all alone with a black crew from Malaita. And Romance lured and beckoned before Joan's eyes when she learned he was Christian Young, a Norfolk Islander, but a direct descendant of John Young, one of the original Bounty mutineers. The blended Tahitian and English blood showed in his soft — Jack London
English London Sayings By Alison Owen: I went to University College London and read English literature, then realised if you were I went to University College London and read English literature, then realised if you were interested in story and narrative, film was the way to go. — Alison Owen
English London Sayings By Mike Leigh: I grew up looking at ... going to the movies a lot, as much as I grew up looking at ... going to the movies a lot, as much as they'd let you. I grew up in Manchester in the north of England in the '40s and '50s. I saw a lot of movies. They were all Hollywood and British movies. I didn't see a film that wasn't in English until I was 17 when I went to London to be a student. — Mike Leigh
English London Sayings By Erik Larson: Marconi recognized that with no revenue and no contracts and in the face of persistent Marconi recognized that with no revenue and no contracts and in the face of persistent skepticism, he needed more than ever to capture an ally of prominence and credibility. Through Fleming, however, Marconi also hoped to gain a benefit more tangible. His new idea, the feat he hoped would command the world's attention once and for all, would require more power and involve greater danger, physical and fiscal, than anything he had attempted before. When it came to high-power engineering, he knew, Fleming was the man to consult. UNLIKE LODGE OR KELVIN, Fleming was susceptible to flattery and needful of attention, as evidenced by the fact that upon receiving Marconi's telegram he made sure the London Times got a copy of it. The Times published it, as part of its coverage of Marconi's English Channel success. — Erik Larson
English London Sayings By Peter Ackroyd: His head was boiled, impaled upon a pole and raised above London Bridge. So ended His head was boiled, impaled upon a pole and raised above London Bridge. So ended the life of Thomas More, one of the few Londoners upon whom sainthood has been conferred and the first English layman to be beatified as a martyr. — Peter Ackroyd
English London Sayings By Charlotte Rampling: I felt very special in Paris, more special than I felt in London. I love I felt very special in Paris, more special than I felt in London. I love London for different reasons. I've always been close to London, being English. But somehow, there's something special about living as an Englishwoman in Paris. — Charlotte Rampling
English London Sayings By Yuval Noah Harari: The first English settlements in North America were established in the early seventeenth century by The first English settlements in North America were established in the early seventeenth century by joint-stock companies such as the London Company, the Plymouth Company, the Dorchester Company and the Massachusetts Company. The Indian subcontinent too was conquered not by the British state, but by the mercenary army of the British East India Company. This company outperformed even the VOC. From its headquarters in Leadenhall Street, London, it ruled a mighty Indian empire for about a century, maintaining a huge military force of up to 350,000 soldiers, considerably outnumbering the armed forces of the British monarchy. Only in 1858 did the British crown nationalise India along with the company's private army. Napoleon made fun of the British, calling them a nation of shopkeepers. Yet these shopkeepers defeated Napoleon himself, and their empire was the largest the world has ever seen. — Yuval Noah Harari
English London Sayings By Gurinder Chadha: Southall Broadway, in west London, has been a constant part of my life from the Southall Broadway, in west London, has been a constant part of my life from the day I arrived in England as a baby from Kenya in 1962. My parents rented a room in one of the terraces off the Broadway, and I've seen it change from an ordinary English high street to what is now 'Little India.' with a confident Asian community. — Gurinder Chadha
English London Sayings By Rose Tremain: My name is Lev," said Lev."My name is Lydia," said the woman. And they shook My name is Lev," said Lev.
"My name is Lydia," said the woman. And they shook hands, Lev's hand holding the scrunched-up kerchief and Lydia's hand rough with salt and smelling of egg, and then Lev asked, "What are you planning to do in En gland?" and Lydia said, "I have some interviews in London for jobs as a translator."
"That sounds promising."
"I hope so. I was a teacher of English at School 237 in Yarbl, so my language is very colloquial."
Lev looked at Lydia. It wasn't difficult to imagine her standing in front of a class and writing words on a blackboard. He said, "I wonder why you're leaving our country when you had a good job at School 237 in Yarbl?"
"Well," said Lydia, "I became very tired of the view from my window. Every day, summer and winter, I looked out at the schoolyard and the high fence and the apartment block beyond, and I began to imagine I would die seeing these things, and I didn't want this. I expect you understand what I mean? — Rose Tremain
English London Sayings By Madeleine K. Albright: When, in May, tensions reached a high point, London warned Berlin that if it attacked When, in May, tensions reached a high point, London warned Berlin that if it attacked Czechoslovakia and the French were embroiled as well, "His Majesty's Government could not guarantee that they would not be forced by circumstances to become involved also". Ar the same time, English officials were telling their counterparts in Paris that they were "not disinterested" in Czechoslovakia's fate. I learned in the course of my own career that British diplomats are trained to write in with precision; so when a double negative is employed, the intent, usually, is not to clarify an issue but to surround it with fog. — Madeleine K. Albright
English London Sayings By Roland Huntford: The English too, were turning their eyes to the South. In 1769, there was to The English too, were turning their eyes to the South. In 1769, there was to be a transit of the planet Venus across the disc of the sun, a rare event which astronomers wanted to observe. The newly discovered island of Tahiti was judged the perfect site. The Royal Society in London asked the Royal Navy to organize the expedition. The Navy obliged. This was to have profound and unlooked-for consequences. It led to the virtual monopolization by naval officers of British Polar exploration until the first decade of this century. The voyage inspired by the transit of Venus was commanded by a man of quiet genius, James Cook, one of the greatest of discoverers. — Roland Huntford
English London Sayings By Colin Callender: One of the things that's different about London and the English market is that theater One of the things that's different about London and the English market is that theater and film and television are all based in London. It's not quite the same as in the States where if the playwright here wants a successful TV or film career, they're whisked away by Hollywood. — Colin Callender
English London Sayings By Ian McEwan: London in the '70s was a pretty catastrophic dump, I can tell you. We had London in the '70s was a pretty catastrophic dump, I can tell you. We had every kind of industrial trouble; we had severe energy problems; we were under constant terrorist attack from Irish terrorist groups who started a bombing campaign in English cities; politics were fantastically polarized between left and right. — Ian McEwan
English London Sayings By Paramahansa Yogananda: Dr. Julian Huxley, famous English biologist and director of UNESCO, recently stated that Western scientists Dr. Julian Huxley, famous English biologist and director of UNESCO, recently stated that Western scientists should "learn the Oriental techniques" for entering the trance state and for control of breathing. "What happens? How is it possible?" he said. An Associated Press dispatch from London, dated Aug. 21, 1948, reported: "Dr. Huxley told the new World Federation for Mental Health it might well look into the mystic lore of the East. If this lore could be investigated scientifically, he advised mental specialists, 'then I think an immense step forward could be made in your field. — Paramahansa Yogananda
English London Sayings By Tasha Smith: Mr. Idris Elba is amazing! He happens to be British, but what's funny about him Mr. Idris Elba is amazing! He happens to be British, but what's funny about him is that when he's speaking in his American dialect, he looks like he's a brother from the 'hood. But as soon as he brings out that English thing, I'm like, 'Woo! You look like you're from London. Oh my God!' It's like everything on him changes. He's so cool! — Tasha Smith
English London Sayings By Agatha Christie: Ah," said Mr Jesmond, "but Christmas in England is a great institution and I assure Ah," said Mr Jesmond, "but Christmas in England is a great institution and I assure you at Kings Lacey you would see it at its best. It's a wonderful old house, you know. Why, one wing of it dates from the fourteenth century."

Again Poirot shivered. The thought of a fourteenth-century English manor house filled him with apprehension. He had suffered too often in the historic country houses of England. He looked round appreciatively at his comfortable modern flat with its radiators and the latest patent devices for excluding any kind of draught.

"In the winter," he said firmly, "I do not leave London. — Agatha Christie
English London Sayings By Eric Fellner: Something like small English films were in vogue you had something like The Crying Game Something like small English films were in vogue you had something like The Crying Game and everyone piled into London and wanted to make small English movies. — Eric Fellner
English London Sayings By Susanna Clarke: He wished he had never come to London. He wished he had never undertaken to He wished he had never come to London. He wished he had never undertaken to revive English magic. He wished he had stayed at Hurtfew Abbey, reading and doing magic for his own pleasure. None of it, he thought, was worth the loss of forty books. — Susanna Clarke
English London Sayings By Donald Hall: A fellowship to Oxford acquainted me with the depths of English cooking. By the twenty-first A fellowship to Oxford acquainted me with the depths of English cooking. By the twenty-first century, London's best restaurants are as good as Paris's, but not in the 1950s. — Donald Hall
English London Sayings By William Monahan: I can work in London. A British journalist asked me if I had any trouble I can work in London. A British journalist asked me if I had any trouble working with an English crew, as an American, and I said I might have if I was from Scotland, but I'm from Massachusetts, which is sort of Oxfordshire, but more intellectual. That's kind of unforgivable but you've got to let them have it. — William Monahan
English London Sayings By Jean-Georges Vongerichten: When I went to London, they told me I spoke with a funny accent - When I went to London, they told me I spoke with a funny accent - English with a Chinese accent. — Jean-Georges Vongerichten
English London Sayings By Boria Sax: It is possible that the city of London was initially named for ravens or a It is possible that the city of London was initially named for ravens or a raven-deity. According to the Oxford Companion to the English Language, the designation comes from "Londinium," a Romanized version of an earlier Celtic name. But the word closely resembles "Lugdunum," the Roman name for both the city of Lyon in France and Leiden in the Netherlands. That Roman name, in turn, was derived from the Celtic "Lugdon," which meant, literally, "hill, or town, of the god Lugh" or, alternatively, " ... of ravens." The site of Lyon was initially chosen for a town when a flock of ravens, avatars of the god, settled there. Whether or not "Lugdunum" was the origin of "London," ravens were important for inhabitants of Britain for both practical and religious reasons. — Boria Sax
English London Sayings By Hume Nisbet: They bear down upon Westminster, the ghost-consecrated Abbey, and the history-crammed Hall, through the arches They bear down upon Westminster, the ghost-consecrated Abbey, and the history-crammed Hall, through the arches of the bridge with a rush as the tide swelters round them; the city is buried in a dusky gloom save where the lights begin to gleam and trail with lurid reflections past black velvety- looking hulls - a dusky city of golden gleams. St. Paul's looms up like an immense bowl reversed, squat, un-English, and undignified in spite of its great size; they dart within the sombre shadows of the Bridge of Sighs, and pass the Tower of London, with the rising moon making the sky behind it luminous, and the crowd of shipping in front appear like a dense forest of withered pines, and then mooring their boat at the steps beyond, with a shuddering farewell look at the eel-like shadows and the glittering lights of that writhing river, with its burthen seen and invisible, they plunge into the purlieus of Wapping.
("The Phantom Model") — Hume Nisbet
English London Sayings By Alexander McCall Smith: Do you realise that people die of boredom in London suburbs? It's the second biggest Do you realise that people die of boredom in London suburbs? It's the second biggest cause of death amongs the English in general. Sheer boredom ... — Alexander McCall Smith
English London Sayings By Lennox Lewis: I have always been English, ever since I emigrated from England and since the kids I have always been English, ever since I emigrated from England and since the kids in Canada beat me up at the age of twelve for having an East London Cockney accent. I thank them for the cockney taunts because the beatings turned me on to boxing. But on a serious note Canada has been kind to me. — Lennox Lewis
English London Sayings By Alan Moore: London has been used as the emblematic English city, but it's far from representative of London has been used as the emblematic English city, but it's far from representative of what life in England is actually about. — Alan Moore
English London Sayings By James Weldon Johnson: I found cause to wonder upon what ground the English accuse Americans of corrupting the I found cause to wonder upon what ground the English accuse Americans of corrupting the language by introducing slang words. I think I heard more and more different kinds of slang during my few weeks' stay in London than in my whole "tenderloin" life in New York. But I suppose the English feel that the language is theirs, and that they may do with it as they please without at the same time allowing that privilege to others. — James Weldon Johnson
English London Sayings By Margaret Fuller: If anything can be invented more excruciating than an English Opera, such as was the If anything can be invented more excruciating than an English Opera, such as was the fashion at the time I was in London, I am sure no sin of mine deserves the punishment of bearing it. — Margaret Fuller
English London Sayings By Ralph Waldo Emerson: Where dwells the religion? Tell me first where dwells electricity, or motion, or thought or Where dwells the religion? Tell me first where dwells electricity, or motion, or thought or gesture. They do not dwell or stay atall. Electricity cannot be made fast, mortared up and ended, like London Monument, or the Tower, so that you shall know where to find it, and keep it fixed, as the English do with their things, forevermore; it is passing, glancing, gesticular; it is a traveller, a newness, a surprise, a secret which perplexes them, and puts them out. — Ralph Waldo Emerson
English London Sayings By Monique Roffey: While I am most at home in London, I cannot really label myself as either While I am most at home in London, I cannot really label myself as either British or Trinidadian. I write in the English language and live in the U.K. I find it hard to say that I am an entirely British writer, especially when I supported Trinidad in the 2006 World Cup and also support the West Indies cricket team. — Monique Roffey
English London Sayings By Jack London: There were not words enough in the English language, nor in any language, to make There were not words enough in the English language, nor in any language, to make his attitude and conduct intelligible to them. — Jack London
English London Sayings By Jack London: He lighted a cigarette, and in the curling smoke of it caught visions of his He lighted a cigarette, and in the curling smoke of it caught visions of his English mother, and wondered if she would understand how her son could love a woman who cried because she could not be skipper of a schooner in the cannibal isles. — Jack London
English London Sayings By Jack London: Who are you, Martin Eden? he demanded of himself in the looking- glass, that night Who are you, Martin Eden? he demanded of himself in the looking-
glass, that night when he got back to his room. He gazed at
himself long and curiously. Who are you? What are you? Where do
you belong? You belong by rights to girls like Lizzie Connolly.
You belong with the legions of toil, with all that is low, and
vulgar, and unbeautiful. You belong with the oxen and the drudges,
in dirty surroundings among smells and stenches. There are the
stale vegetables now. Those potatoes are rotting. Smell them,
damn you, smell them. And yet you dare to open the books, to
listen to beautiful music, to learn to love beautiful paintings, to
speak good English, to think thoughts that none of your own kind
thinks, to tear yourself away from the oxen and the Lizzie
Connollys and to love a pale spirit of a woman who is a million
miles beyond you and who lives in the stars! Who are you? and what
are you? damn you! And are you going to make good? — Jack London
English London Sayings By Gloria Steinem: During World War II, a few years after Norma Jeane's time in an orphanage, thousands During World War II, a few years after Norma Jeane's time in an orphanage, thousands of children were evacuated from the air raids and poor rations of London during the Blitz, and placed with volunteer families or group homes in the English countryside or even in other countries. It was only postwar studies comparing these children to others left behind that opened the eyes of many experts to the damage caused by emotional neglect. In spite of living in bombed-out ruins and constant fear of attack, the children who had been left with their mothers and families tended to fare better than those who had been evacuated to physical safety. Emotional security, continuity, a sense of being loved unconditionally for oneself - all those turn out to be as important to a child's development as all but the most basic food and shelter. — Gloria Steinem
English London Sayings By Neal Stephenson: If Admiral Tourville's invasion-fleet makes it across the Channel without being sunk by the Royal If Admiral Tourville's invasion-fleet makes it across the Channel without being sunk by the Royal Navy, and if the Papist legion establishes a beachhead on English soil without being destroyed by the Army or torn to bits by an enraged Mobb of English rurals, then I shall personally carry every single one of your coins from the Tower of London to the front in my arse-hole, and Deposit them in some Place where they may be easily Picked Up. — Neal Stephenson
English London Sayings By Allegra Huston: When I moved to London at age 16, tired of the shuffle around other people's When I moved to London at age 16, tired of the shuffle around other people's houses and ready to live on my own, I met my English brother and sister, who instantly claimed me as family. — Allegra Huston
English London Sayings By Honore De Balzac: The fashions we call English in Paris are French in London, and vice versa. Franco-British The fashions we call English in Paris are French in London, and vice versa. Franco-British hostility vanishes when it comes to questions of words and clothing. God save the King is a tune composed by Lully for a chorus in a play by Racine. — Honore De Balzac
English London Sayings By Juan Pablo Di Pace: I spent ten years in London; I trained there. But because I started in English, I spent ten years in London; I trained there. But because I started in English, it kind of feels the most natural to me, to act in English, which is a strange thing. My language is Spanish; I grew up in Argentina. I speak to my family in Spanish, but if you were to ask me what language I connect with, it'd be English in some weird way. — Juan Pablo Di Pace
English London Sayings By Maureen Johnson: English rain feels obligatory, like paperwork. It dampens already damn days and slicks the stones. English rain feels obligatory, like paperwork. It dampens already damn days and slicks the stones. — Maureen Johnson
English London Sayings By Sydney Goodsir Smith: The typical Scottish writer of the nineteenth century went down to London with great talents, The typical Scottish writer of the nineteenth century went down to London with great talents, sometimes even genius, attempted for a short time to work in the English tradition for an English public and then, having drifted through hack journalism, either starved to death in a garret or took his own life. — Sydney Goodsir Smith
English London Sayings By Aporva Kala: But why have you dear English Jew whose forefathers fought to enter the country of But why have you dear English Jew whose forefathers fought to enter the country of Johnny Mill, the Stuart with a little heart, saunter in Haridwar, no pubs or fish and chips' counters here, only Ganga-Jal, -the holy ale- Quaff it for the spirit and carry it to the banks of Thames in a holy grail. — Aporva Kala
English London Sayings By Jeremy Harding: In the end it comes down to two rival versions of the English middle afternoon. In the end it comes down to two rival versions of the English middle afternoon. Post-Barrett, Pink Floyd kept on in a middle-afternoonish vein, but they fell in love with the idea of portentous storm clouds in the offing somewhere over Grantchester ... Barrett's afternoonishness was far more supple and engaging. It superimposed the hippie cult of eternal solstice on the pre-teatime daydreams of one's childhood, occasioned by a slick of sunlight on a chest of drawers ... His afternoonishness is lit by an importunate adult intelligence that can't quite get back to the place it longs to be ... Barrett created the same precocious longing in adolescents.
I remember 'See Emily Play' drifting across a school corridor in 1967 ... and I remember the powerful wish to stay suspended indefinitely in that music ... I also remember the quasi-adult intimation that this wasn't possible.
[from the London Review of Books for January 2, 2003] — Jeremy Harding
English London Sayings By Linda Sue Park: After high school, I went to Stanford University and majored in English. Of course, that After high school, I went to Stanford University and majored in English. Of course, that gave me a chance to do lots more reading and writing. I also received degrees in London and Dublin - where I moved to be near a charming Irishman who became my husband! — Linda Sue Park
English London Sayings By Patrick White: In spite of holidays when I was free to visit London theatres and explore the In spite of holidays when I was free to visit London theatres and explore the countryside, I spent four very miserable years as a colonial at an English school. — Patrick White
English London Sayings By Diana Gabaldon: There was news to hear and to ask about - of English patrols in the There was news to hear and to ask about - of English patrols in the district, of politics, of arrests and trials in London and Edinburgh. That he could wait for. Better to talk to Ian about the estate, to Jenny about the children. If it seemed safe, the children would be brought down to say hello to their uncle, to give him sleepy hugs and damp kisses before stumbling back to their beds. — Diana Gabaldon
English London Sayings By Donald Trump: It's a beautiful city, and the waterfront area is fantastic. I haven't had time to It's a beautiful city, and the waterfront area is fantastic. I haven't had time to visit the theatre, but I find it remarkable that Toronto has the third-largest English-speaking theatre district in the world, after New York and London. I once noticed a fellow sitting on a bench, then I realized it was a statue of Glenn Gould. It's very realistic. — Donald Trump
English London Sayings By Fernando Torres: Madrid is not as big as London, but it is true when you are coming Madrid is not as big as London, but it is true when you are coming from a big city like Madrid, nothing is going to surprise you, and I am very happy to move to a city like London. It is a big city, and you can do everything you want with the respect that the English people always have. — Fernando Torres
English London Sayings By Ken Follett: Half the people in London were not English anyway: they were Irish, Scottish, Welsh, Caribbean, Half the people in London were not English anyway: they were Irish, Scottish, Welsh, Caribbean, Indian and Chinese. All the drug dealers came from islands: Maltese men sold pep pills, — Ken Follett
English London Sayings By Lucy Robinson: Bloody Americans. Why did they have to DATE? Why couldn't they just spend their time Bloody Americans. Why did they have to DATE? Why couldn't they just spend their time ignoring each other, like the English? If he'd stayed in London he would never have met anyone. he'd be alone and unhappy, like me, but at least he wouldn't be DATING. — Lucy Robinson
English London Sayings By Zadie Smith: The really heroic thing about Nick Hornby is that he lives in north London and The really heroic thing about Nick Hornby is that he lives in north London and rarely leaves it ... Every English writer needs their corner that is forever England - but only a few brave men choose to make that corner Highbury. — Zadie Smith
English London Sayings By Andrew Gimson: The first great writer of English, Geoffrey Chaucer, was born in about 1343, the son The first great writer of English, Geoffrey Chaucer, was born in about 1343, the son of a London vintner, and early in life found employment at court, where he married a lady-in-waiting to the queen and in 1374 received from the king exactly the encouragement an author needs, namely "a gallon of wine daily for the rest of his life. — Andrew Gimson
English London Sayings By Jules Verne: An English criminal, you know is always better concealed in London than anywhere else. An English criminal, you know is always better concealed in London than anywhere else. — Jules Verne
English London Sayings By Sarah Lotz: Not only was Bobby Small living in a Jewish household (although I know the Jews Not only was Bobby Small living in a Jewish household (although I know the Jews have their place in God's plan) but Stephenie said she'd read in the Inquirer that he was one of those test-tube babies. 'Not born of man,' she said. 'Unnatural.' Then there were those stories about the English girl being made to live with one of those homosexuals in London, and the Jap boy's father making those android abominations. — Sarah Lotz
English London Sayings By Tom Hooper: Well, I'm half Australian, half English and I live in London. That is the only Well, I'm half Australian, half English and I live in London. That is the only reason I came upon this story. My Australian mother, Meredith Hooper, was invited in late 2007 by some Australian friends to make up a token Australian audience in a tiny fringe theater play reading of an unproduced, unrehearsed play called 'The King's Speech.' — Tom Hooper
English London Sayings By Andy Serkis: I never felt totally, 100%, patriotically English ... I'd seen a lot of the world I never felt totally, 100%, patriotically English ... I'd seen a lot of the world by an early age - sort of spent a lot of time traveling around Lebanon and I'd seen Babylon, and Damascus, and all sorts of places in the Middle East by the time I was ten. Then we'd return to Ruslip in West London ... Done a fair bit of traveling really. — Andy Serkis
English London Sayings By Daniel Day-Lewis: One of the great privileges of having grown up in a middle-class literary English household, One of the great privileges of having grown up in a middle-class literary English household, but having gone to school in the front lines in Southeast London, was that I became half-street-urchin and half-good-boy at home. I knew that dichotomy was possible. — Daniel Day-Lewis
English London Sayings By Ian McEwan: I craved a form of naive realism. I paid special attention, I craned my readerly I craved a form of naive realism. I paid special attention, I craned my readerly neck whenever a London street I knew was mentioned, or a style of frock, a real public person, even a make of car. Then, I thought, I had a measure, I could guage the quality of the writing by its accuracy, by the extent to which it aligned with my own impressions, or improved upon them. I was fortunate that most English writing of the time was in the form of undemanding social documentary. I wasn't impressed by those writers (they were spread between South and North America) who infiltrated their own pages as part of the cast, determined to remind poor reader that all the characters and even they themselves were pure inventions and the there was a difference between fiction and life. Or, to the contrary, to insist that life was a fiction anyway. Only writers, I thought, were ever in danger of confusing the two. — Ian McEwan
English London Sayings By John Cleese: I'm not sure what's going on in Britain. I don't know what's going on in I'm not sure what's going on in Britain. I don't know what's going on in London. Because London is no longer an English city, and that's how they got the Olympics. I mean, they said, "We're the most cosmopolitan city on Earth," but it doesn't feel English. — John Cleese
English London Sayings By Jens Lehmann: In England everything is liberalised. Within certain boundaries and rules everybody can do what he In England everything is liberalised. Within certain boundaries and rules everybody can do what he likes. Maybe London's society has a different tempo, a different dynamic. London is fast, productive, creative but it is not England. If you want to transfer that to football, you could say: in the four big English clubs and maybe in the one or two behind them there is a top level. Everything that comes after that rather mirrors English society. It's honest, fair and hard, sometimes also fast, but not always so perfect. — Jens Lehmann
English London Sayings By Edward Rutherfurd: And in busy London there now grew up one of the greatest gifts that the And in busy London there now grew up one of the greatest gifts that the English genius was to leave the world. For in the reign of Elizabeth I began the first and greatest flowering of the glorious English theatre. — Edward Rutherfurd
English London Sayings By Mark Strong: Interestingly, this character [Doctor Nash] is probably closer to me than somebody like the evil Interestingly, this character [Doctor Nash] is probably closer to me than somebody like the evil Sir Godfrey in Robin Hood or Lord Blackwood who wants to take over the world in Sherlock Holmes. This is a character that's English, he's based in London, and so it's closer to me than a lot of stuff I've been doing recently. — Mark Strong
English London Sayings By Clay Shirky: One of the problems with any kind of talking about the media landscape is that One of the problems with any kind of talking about the media landscape is that we've just been through an unusually stable period in which, for fifty years, English language media was centered in three cities - London, New York, and Los Angeles - around a very stable group of people working in a relatively stable set of media. — Clay Shirky
English London Sayings By Stephen Fry: The English language is like London: proudly barbaric yet deeply civilised, too, common yet royal, The English language is like London: proudly barbaric yet deeply civilised, too, common yet royal, vulgar yet processional, sacred yet profane. Each sentence we produce, whether we know it or not, is a mongrel mouthful of Chaucerian, Shakespearean, Miltonic, Johnsonian, Dickensian and American. Military, naval, legal, corporate, criminal, jazz, rap and ghetto discourses are mingled at every turn. The French language, like Paris, has attempted, through its Academy, to retain its purity, to fight the advancing tides of Franglais and international prefabrication. English, by comparison, is a shameless whore. — Stephen Fry
English London Sayings By Brian Christian: When Charles Darwin was trying to decide whether he should propose to his cousin Emma When Charles Darwin was trying to decide whether he should propose to his cousin Emma Wedgwood, he got out a pencil and paper and weighed every possible consequence. In favor of marriage he listed children, companionship, and the 'charms of music and female chit-chat.' Against marriage he listed the 'terrible loss of time,' lack of freedom to go where he wished, the burden of visiting relatives, the expense and anxiety provoked by children, the concern that 'perhaps my wife won't like London,' and having less money to spend on books. Weighing one column against the other produced a narrow margin of victory, and at the bottom Darwin scrawled, 'Marry - Marry - Marry Q.E.D.' Quod erat demonstrandum, the mathematical sign-off that Darwin himself restated in English: 'It being proved necessary to Marry. — Brian Christian
English London Sayings By Gyorgy Ligeti: Once, in London, the BBC asked me what was my favorite English book. I said Once, in London, the BBC asked me what was my favorite English book. I said Alice in Wonderland. — Gyorgy Ligeti
English London Sayings By Italo Zucchelli: In the past, people couldn't place me. They thought that I was Danish or English In the past, people couldn't place me. They thought that I was Danish or English or French. They never got that I am Italian. I'm not typical, maybe because my visual education was very mixed. There was a lot of London in my aesthetic: The Face, i-D, British music, and a lot of British fashion ... But I really enjoy this contrast. — Italo Zucchelli
English London Sayings By Mark Twain: London, on a certain autumn day in the second quarter of the sixteenth century, a London, on a certain autumn day in the second quarter of the sixteenth century, a boy was born to a poor family of the name of Canty, who did not want him. On the same day another English child was born to a rich family of the name of Tudor, who did want him. All England wanted him too. England had so longed for him, and hoped for him, and prayed God for him, that, now that he was really come, the people went nearly mad for joy. Mere acquaintances hugged and kissed each other and cried. Everybody took a holiday, and high and low, rich — Mark Twain
English London Sayings By Yuval Noah Harari: In the late nineteenth century, many educated Indians were taught the same lesson by their In the late nineteenth century, many educated Indians were taught the same lesson by their British masters. One famous anecdote tells of an ambitious Indian who mastered the intricacies of the English language, took lessons in Western-style dance, and even became accustomed to eating with a knife and fork. Equipped with his new manners, he travelled to England, studied law at University College London, and became a qualified barrister. Yet this young man of law, bedecked in suit and tie, was thrown off a train in the British colony of South Africa for insisting on travelling first class instead of settling for third class, where 'coloured' men like him were supposed to ride. His name was Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi. — Yuval Noah Harari
English London Sayings By Walter Kirn: I had the impression from reading English literature that British women were great beauties, and I had the impression from reading English literature that British women were great beauties, and I only had seen Julie Christie, and she was gorgeous and sexy. I don't know whether it was just my taste, but when I got to London, I went two years without seeing a truly attractive woman. A lot of near misses. — Walter Kirn
English London Sayings By Graham Coxon: I think now, more than anytime I can remember, bands are sounding pretty similar whether I think now, more than anytime I can remember, bands are sounding pretty similar whether they're English or American, from Manchester or London ... or Leeds or Welsh or Irish. — Graham Coxon
English London Sayings By Tom Parker Bowles: London was a spice mecca. The first recipe for curry in English was actually published London was a spice mecca. The first recipe for curry in English was actually published in 1747. — Tom Parker Bowles
English London Sayings By Simon Schama: Jewish history has been in my cultural DNA since I was a child growing up Jewish history has been in my cultural DNA since I was a child growing up in post-war London. In the midst of that dark, gray, lamenting monochromatic world of the '50s, I had a sense that both Jewish and English history were full of color and light and animation. — Simon Schama
English London Sayings By Arthur Symons: The English mist is always at work like a subtle painter, and London is a The English mist is always at work like a subtle painter, and London is a vast canvas prepared for the mist to work on. — Arthur Symons
English London Sayings By Chinua Achebe: Four years in England had filled Obi with a longing to be back in Umuofia. Four years in England had filled Obi with a longing to be back in Umuofia. This feeling was sometimes so strong that he found himself feeling ashamed of studying English for his degree. He spoke Ibo whenever he had the least opportunity of doing so. Nothing gave him greater pleasure than to find another Ibo-speaking student in a London bus. But when he had to speak in English with a Nigerian student from another tribe he lowered his voice. It was humiliating to have to speak to one's countryman in a foreign language, especially in the presence of the proud owners of that language. They would naturally assume that one had no language of one's own. He wished they were here today to see. Let them come to Umuofia now and listen to the talk of men who made a great art of conversation. Let them come and see men and women and children who knew how to live, whose joy of life had not yet been killed by those who claimed to teach other nations how to live. — Chinua Achebe
English London Sayings By Edie Campbell: There's a thing in the U.K., particularly in London, where it's kind of the idea There's a thing in the U.K., particularly in London, where it's kind of the idea of subculture and counterculture and the outside and the idea that it's great to be a freak, and the freak always wins. So I think English girls are a lot less scared of being the freak or looking like an idiot. — Edie Campbell