Hersey's Famous Quotes & Sayings

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64 Hersey's Famous Sayings, Quotes and Quotation.

Hersey's Sayings By Howard Zinn: I was a bombadier in WW 2. When you are up 30,000 feet you do I was a bombadier in WW 2. When you are up 30,000 feet you do not hear the screams or smell the blood or see those without limbs or eyes. It was not til I read Hersey's Hiroshima that I realized what bomber pilots do. — Howard Zinn
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Hersey's Sayings By Sandra Hersey: If you want victory in your life you must learn to be alone with your If you want victory in your life you must learn to be alone with your own thoughts and cause them to be correct thoughts! — Sandra Hersey
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Hersey's Sayings By Hampton Sides: Probably the biggest influence on my career was the late John Hersey, who, while he Probably the biggest influence on my career was the late John Hersey, who, while he was at 'The New Yorker,' wrote one of the masterpieces of narrative non-fiction, 'Hiroshima.' Hersey was a teacher of mine at Yale, and a friend. He got me to see the possibility of journalism not just as a business but as an art form. — Hampton Sides
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Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: You're not impatient any more. Then you were in a hurry, because you thought you You're not impatient any more. Then you were in a hurry, because you thought you could encompass everything in your life. You wanted to learn everything and experience everything and be everybody. In a way, that was charming and delightful in you: I used to write in my notebooks that you were zestful. But it also made you seem confused. You did things in fits and starts. You learned as a stammerer talks ... Today, you are not in such a hurry. I think you have decided that you can do only a few things at all well, and they are more than enough. — John Hersey
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Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: At exactly fifteen minutes past eight in the morning, on August 6, 1945, Japanese time, At exactly fifteen minutes past eight in the morning, on August 6, 1945, Japanese time, at the moment when the atomic bomb flashed above Hiroshima, Miss Toshiko Sasaki, a clerk in the personnel department of the East Asia Tin Works, had just sat down at her place in the plant office and was turning her head to speak to the girl at the next desk. — John Hersey
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Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: A writer is bound to have varying degrees of success, and I think that that A writer is bound to have varying degrees of success, and I think that that is partly an issue of how central the burden of the story is to the author's psyche. — John Hersey
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Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: The price one pays for having a kind man at one's elbow. The price one pays for having a kind man at one's elbow. — John Hersey
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Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: Learning starts with failure; the first failure is the beginning of education. Learning starts with failure; the first failure is the beginning of education. — John Hersey
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Hersey's Sayings By Jessi Hersey: To find love is rare but can be true if found unconditionally without any regreat To find love is rare but can be true if found unconditionally without any regreat look to the present and their you will find love — Jessi Hersey
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Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: The third stage was the reaction that came when the body struggled to compensate for The third stage was the reaction that came when the body struggled to compensate for its ills - when, for instance, the white count not only returned to normal but increased to much higher than normal levels. — John Hersey
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Hersey's Sayings By Jean Hersey: I love planting bulbs. It is making promises with tomorrow, believing in next year and I love planting bulbs. It is making promises with tomorrow, believing in next year and the future. — Jean Hersey
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Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: Journalism allows its readers to witness history; fiction gives its readers an opportunity to live Journalism allows its readers to witness history; fiction gives its readers an opportunity to live it. — John Hersey
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Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: The second stage set in ten or fifteen days after the bombing. Its first symptom The second stage set in ten or fifteen days after the bombing. Its first symptom was falling hair. Diarrhea and fever, which in some cases went as high as 106, came next. — John Hersey
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Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: Do not work primarily for money; do your duty to patients first and let the Do not work primarily for money; do your duty to patients first and let the money follow; our life is short, we don't live twice; the whirlwind will pick up the leaves and spin them, but then it will drop them and they will form a pile. — John Hersey
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Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: What has kept the world safe from the bomb since 1945 has not been deterrence, What has kept the world safe from the bomb since 1945 has not been deterrence, in the sense of fear of specific weapons, so much as it's been memory. The memory of what happened at Hiroshima. — John Hersey
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Hersey's Sayings By Jane Hersey: I do not use psychiatric terms in my writing because the entrenched and developing behaviours I do not use psychiatric terms in my writing because the entrenched and developing behaviours were perfectly normal reactions to abnormal situations. — Jane Hersey
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Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: Over everything - up through the wreckage of the city, in gutters, along the riverbanks, Over everything - up through the wreckage of the city, in gutters, along the riverbanks, tangled among tiles and tin roofing, climbing on charred tree trunks - was a blanket of fresh, vivid, lush, optimistic green; the verdancy rose even from the foundations of ruined houses. Weeds already hid the ashes, and wild flowers were in bloom among the city's bones. The bomb had not only left the underground organs of the plants intact; it had stimulated them. — John Hersey
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Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: To be a writer is to sit down at one's desk in the chill portion To be a writer is to sit down at one's desk in the chill portion of every day, and to write; not waiting for the little jet of the blue flame of genius to start from the breastbone - just plain going at it, in pain and delight. To be a writer is to throw away a great deal, not to be satisfied, to type again, and then again, and once more, and over and over ... — John Hersey
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Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: The first stage had been all over before the doctors even knew they were dealing The first stage had been all over before the doctors even knew they were dealing with a new sickness; it was the direct reaction to the bombardment of the body, at the moment when the bomb went off, by neutrons, beta particles, and gamma rays. — John Hersey
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Hersey's Sayings By William Hersey Davis: Reputation is what men say about you on your tombstone;Character is what the angels say Reputation is what men say about you on your tombstone;
Character is what the angels say about you before the throne of God — William Hersey Davis
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Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: The reality is that changes are coming ... They must come. You must share in The reality is that changes are coming ... They must come. You must share in bringing them. — John Hersey
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Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: The crux of the matter is whether total war in its present form is justifiable, The crux of the matter is whether total war in its present form is justifiable, even when it serves a just purpose. Does it not have material and spiritual evil as its consequences which far exceed whatever good might result? When will our moralists give us an answer to this question? — John Hersey
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Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: I thought of God as being able to talk big and write *very* small. I thought of God as being able to talk big and write *very* small. — John Hersey
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Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: My two major faults are that I row too long and pick up too many My two major faults are that I row too long and pick up too many women — John Hersey
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Hersey's Sayings By Jean Hersey: Flowers speak to us if we listen. Appreciating the blossom in hand or pausing in Flowers speak to us if we listen. Appreciating the blossom in hand or pausing in the garden to admire the beauty quiets our outer selves till we hear something new, something we did not hear before - the still, small voice of Nature herself. — Jean Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: My prevailing interest has been in the world as a whole, and in the place My prevailing interest has been in the world as a whole, and in the place of a person in a larger setting than one defined by national boundaries. — John Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By Jean Hersey: September is a sweep of dusky, purple asters, a sumac branch swinging a fringe of September is a sweep of dusky, purple asters, a sumac branch swinging a fringe of scarlet leaves, and the bittersweet scene of wild grapes when I walk down the lane to the mailbox. September is a golden month of mellow sunlight and still clear days ... Small creatures in the grass, as if realizing their days are numbered, cram the night air with sound. Everywhere goldenrod is full out. — Jean Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By Jean Hersey: Some days confidence shrinks to the size of a pea, and the backbone feels like Some days confidence shrinks to the size of a pea, and the backbone feels like a feather. We want to be somewhere else, and don't know where - want to be someone else and don't know who. — Jean Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By Jean Hersey: My prayer for the new year is that I may have the courage and the My prayer for the new year is that I may have the courage and the stamina to let Life happen to me, to accept its joys and successes, and to take in stride the learning that stretches us and the growing pains. Perhaps, to put it simply, my wish for the New Year is: may we love more, live more, laugh more. And so may you! — Jean Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: Dr. Y. Hiraiwa, professor of Hiroshima University of Literature and Science, and one of my Dr. Y. Hiraiwa, professor of Hiroshima University of Literature and Science, and one of my church members, was buried by the bomb under the two storied house with his son, a student of Tokyo University. Both of them could not move an inch under tremendously heavy pressure. And the house already caught fire. His son said, 'Father, we can do nothing except make our mind up to consecrate our lives for the country. Let us give Banzai to our Emperor.' Then the father followed after his son, 'Tenno-heika, Banzai, Banzai, Banzai!' . . . In thinking of their experience of that time Dr. Hiraiwa repeated, 'What a fortunate that we are Japanese! It was my first time I ever tasted such a beautiful spirit when I decided to die for our Emperor. — John Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By Jean Hersey: When you plant early, you bring spring early. When you plant early, you bring spring early. — Jean Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: Green pine trees, cranes and turtles ... You must tell a story of your hard Green pine trees, cranes and
turtles ...
You must tell a story of your
hard times
And laugh twice. — John Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By Jane Hersey: As I grew into womanhood my confusion at the world became more apparent. I was As I grew into womanhood my confusion at the world became more apparent. I was taking comfort in behaviours that were familiar, not bathing, wearing multiple layers of clothes and, like my mother, I was bingeing on food. Of course I was still very much a lonely unsupported child myself when I got pregnant - one who had never been nurtured or mothered and as such I struggled with the responsibilities of parenthood. — Jane Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: The writer must not invent. The legend on the license must read: NONE OF THIS The writer must not invent. The legend on the license must read: NONE OF THIS WAS MADE UP. — John Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: It's a failure of national vision when you regard children as weapons, and talents as It's a failure of national vision when you regard children as weapons, and talents as materials you can mine, assay, and fabricate for profit and defense. — John Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By Jean Hersey: A flower is a daisy chain, a graduation, a valentine; a flower is New Year's A flower is a daisy chain, a graduation, a valentine; a flower is New Year's Eve and an orchid in your hair; a flower is a single geranium blooming in a tin can on a murky city fire-escape; an acre of roses at the Botanical Gardens; and the first gold crocus of spring! ... a flower is a birth, a wedding, a leaving of this life. — Jean Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By Tadatoshi Akiba: In some ways more painful is the fact that their experience appears to be fading In some ways more painful is the fact that their experience appears to be fading from the collective memory of humankind. Having never experienced an atomic bombing, the vast majority around the world can only vaguely imagine such horror, and these days, John Hersey's Hiroshima and Jonathan Schell's The Fate of the Earth are all but forgotten. As predicted by the saying, 'Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it,' the probability that nuclear weapons will be used and the danger of nuclear war are increasing. — Tadatoshi Akiba
Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: Events are less important than our responses to them. Events are less important than our responses to them. — John Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By Jean Hersey: August is ripening grain in the fields blowing hot and sunny, the scent of tree-ripened August is ripening grain in the fields blowing hot and sunny, the scent of tree-ripened peaches, of hot buttered sweet corn on the cob. Vivid dahlias fling huge tousled blossoms through gardens and joe-pye-weed dusts the meadow purple. — Jean Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: All morning they watched for the plane which they thought would be looking for them. All morning they watched for the plane which they thought would be looking for them. They cursed war in general and PTs in particular. At about ten o'clock the hulk heaved a moist sigh and turned turtle. — John Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By Jean Hersey: October arrives in a swirl of fragrant blue leaf smoke, the sweetness of slightly frosted October arrives in a swirl of fragrant blue leaf smoke, the sweetness of slightly frosted MacIntosh apples, and little hard acorns falling. We are in the midst of cool crisp days, purple mists, and Nature recklessly tossing her whole palette of dazzling tones through fields and woodlands. — Jean Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By Jean Hersey: November is chill, frosted mornings with a silver sun rising behind the trees, red cardinals November is chill, frosted mornings with a silver sun rising behind the trees, red cardinals at the feeders, and squirrels running scallops along the tops of the gray stone walls. — Jean Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: Their faces were wholly burned, their eyesockets were hollow, the fluid from their melted eyes Their faces were wholly burned, their eyesockets were hollow, the fluid from their melted eyes had run down their cheeks. — John Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: When the writing is really working, I think there is something like dreaming going on. When the writing is really working, I think there is something like dreaming going on. I don't know how to draw the line between the conscious management of what you're doing and this state ... I would say that it's related to daydreaming. When I feel really engaged with a passage, I become so lost in it that I'm unaware of my real surroundings, totally involved in the pictures and sounds that that passage evokes. — John Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By Jean Hersey: January is the month for dreaming. January is the month for dreaming. — Jean Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By Jane Hersey: Marginalised and abused children are often overlooked even today, and risk becoming marginalised and abused Marginalised and abused children are often overlooked even today, and risk becoming marginalised and abused adults who may never receive acknowledgment or respect for the immense physical and emotional burden they carry from childhood or indeed have their full potential realised. — Jane Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By Jean Hersey: June is the gateway to summer ... June is the gateway to summer ... — Jean Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: There, in the tin factory, in the first moment of the atomic age, a human There, in the tin factory, in the first moment of the atomic age, a human being was crushed by books. — John Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By Jean Hersey: July is hollyhocks and hammocks, fireworks and vacations, hot and steamy weather, cool and refreshing July is hollyhocks and hammocks, fireworks and vacations, hot and steamy weather, cool and refreshing swims, beach picnics, and vegetables all out of the garden - first sweet corn on the cob dripping with butter, first tomatoes dead ripe and sunwarm, string beans, squash, crisp cucumbers. July can also be hard and shiny, brassy and sharp. Some days are like copper pennies in the sunlight. — Jean Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By Jean Hersey: In March winter is holding back and spring is pulling forward. Something holds and something In March winter is holding back and spring is pulling forward. Something holds and something pulls inside of us too. — Jean Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By Paul Hersey: High expectations and belief in people leads to high performance so very often belief creates High expectations and belief in people leads to high performance so very often belief creates fact. — Paul Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: This private estate was far enough away from the explosion so that its bamboos, pines, This private estate was far enough away from the explosion so that its bamboos, pines, laurel, and maples were still alive, and the green place invited refugees - partly because they believed that if the Americans came back, they would bomb only buildings; partly because the foliage seemed a center of coolness and life, and the estate's exquisitely precise rock gardens, with their quiet pools and arching bridges, were very Japanese, normal, secure; and also partly (according to some who were there) because of an irresistible, atavistic urge to hide under leaves. — John Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: The doctors realized in retrospect that even though most of these dead had also suffered The doctors realized in retrospect that even though most of these dead had also suffered from burns and blast effects, they had absorbed enough radiation to kill them. The rays simply destroyed body cells - caused their nuclei to degenerate and broke their walls. — John Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: Many people who did not die right away came down with nausea, headache, diarrhea, malaise, Many people who did not die right away came down with nausea, headache, diarrhea, malaise, and fever, which lasted several days. Doctors could not be certain whether some of these symptoms were the result of radiation or nervous shock. — John Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: The final test of a work of art is not whether it has beauty, but The final test of a work of art is not whether it has beauty, but whether it has power. — John Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: Dr. Wyman preached a God I couldn't quite see in my mind, and certainly couldn't Dr. Wyman preached a God I couldn't quite see in my mind, and certainly couldn't love. I dimly pictured some kind of Grandfather, who dealt out to bad people their awful "just deserts," which I thought must be poisoned food at the end of delicious meals. — John Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: To my great surprise, I never heard anyone cry out in the disorder, even though To my great surprise, I never heard anyone cry out in the disorder, even though they suffered in great agony. They died in silence, with no grudge, setting their teeth to bear it. All for the country! — John Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By Paul Hersey: People differ not only in their ability to do but also in their 'will to People differ not only in their ability to do but also in their 'will to do' — Paul Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By Jean Hersey: In July everybody you telephone is somewhere else - either on the beach or on In July everybody you telephone is somewhere else - either on the beach or on vacation, and half the time you're somewhere else too. — Jean Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By Anonymous: Blitz to V-E Day. After the war was over, the novelist John Hersey invented a Blitz to V-E Day. After the war was over, the novelist John Hersey invented a new kind of journalism, modelled on the techniques of fiction, in his report about the atomic-bomb attack on Hiroshima, which filled an entire issue of the magazine in the summer of 1946. That June, Ross wrote to Flanner, with a touch of rue, "Probably the magazine will never get back to where it was." The war took The New Yorker out of the city and into the world. — Anonymous
Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: He was the only person making his way into the city; he met hundreds and He was the only person making his way into the city; he met hundreds and hundreds who were fleeing, and every one of them seemed to be hurt in some way. The eyebrows of some were burned off and skin hung from their faces and hands. Others, because of pain, held their arms up as if carrying something in both hands. Some were vomiting as they walked. Many were naked or in shreds of clothing. On some undressed bodies, the burns had made patterns - of undershirt straps and suspenders and, on the skin of some women (since white repelled the heat from the bomb and dark clothes absorbed it and conducted it to the skin), the shapes of flowers they had had on their kimonos. Many, although injured themselves, supported relatives who were worse off. Almost all had their heads bowed, looked straight ahead, were silent, and showed no expression whatsoever. — John Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: It seems logical that he who supports total war in principle cannot complain of a It seems logical that he who supports total war in principle cannot complain of a war against civilians. — John Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By Jean Hersey: Lilacs are May in essence. Lilacs are May in essence. — Jean Hersey
Hersey's Sayings By John Hersey: And, as if nature were protecting man against his own ingenuity, the reproductive processes were And, as if nature were protecting man against his own ingenuity, the reproductive processes were affected for a time; men became sterile, women had miscarriages, menstruation stopped. — John Hersey