Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Famous Quotes & Sayings

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26 Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Famous Sayings, Quotes and Quotation.

Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jean-Jacques Rousseau: Liberty may be gained, but can never be recovered. (Bk2:8) Liberty may be gained, but can never be recovered. (Bk2:8) — Jean-Jacques Rousseau
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Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jean-Jacques Rousseau: Happy am I, for every time I meditate on governments, I always find new reasons Happy am I, for every time I meditate on governments, I always find new reasons in my inquiries for loving my own country. — Jean-Jacques Rousseau
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Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By P. J. O'Rourke: Democrats are liberals, and - to their profound embarrassment - liberalism is an old, white Democrats are liberals, and - to their profound embarrassment - liberalism is an old, white European male political philosophy. Liberalism is based on the thought of John Locke, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Thomas Paine, and - oh, the shame of it - slave-owning, woman-exploiting Thomas Jefferson. Liberalism is deeply confusing to liberals. America's first great liberal populist was Andrew Jackson, perpetrator of the genocidal Trail of Tears and annihilator of the Second Bank of the United States and hence of centralized economic control. (Sadly, Jackson put an end to the Second Bank of the United States before Hillary Clinton had a chance to claim large lecture fees for speaking to its executives.) Plus, liberalism is painfully unhip. Say "Great Society" to today's with-it young Democratic voters and they hear air quotes around the "Great." LBJ — P. J. O'Rourke
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Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jean-Jacques Rousseau: I believed that I was approaching the end of my days without having tasted to I believed that I was approaching the end of my days without having tasted to the full any of the pleasures for which my heart thirsted ... without having ever tasted that passion which, through lack of an object, was always suppressed ... The impossibility of attaining the real persons precipitated me into the land of chimeras; and seeing nothing that existed worthy of my exalted feelings, I fostered them in an ideal world which my creative imagination soon peopled with beings after my own heart. — Jean-Jacques Rousseau
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Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jean-Jacques Rousseau: He thinks like a philosopher, but governs like a king. He thinks like a philosopher, but governs like a king. — Jean-Jacques Rousseau
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Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jean-Jacques Rousseau: Our will is always for our own good, but we do not always see what Our will is always for our own good, but we do not always see what that is; the people is never corrupted, but it is often deceived ... (Bk2:3) — Jean-Jacques Rousseau
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Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jean-Jacques Rousseau: It is reason which breeds pride and reflection which fortifies it; reason which turns man It is reason which breeds pride and reflection which fortifies it; reason which turns man inward into himself; reason which separates him from everything which troubles or affects him. It is philosophy which isolates a man, and prompts him to say in secret at the sight of another suffering: 'Perish if you will; I am safe.' No longer can anything but dangers to society in general disturb the tranquil sleep of the philosopher or drag him from his bed. A fellow-man may with impunity be murdered under his window, for the philosopher has only to put his hands over his ears and argue a little with himself to prevent nature, which rebels inside him, from making him identify himself with the victim of the murder. The savage man entirely lacks this admirable talent, and for want of wisdom and reason he always responds recklessly to the first promptings of human feeling. — Jean-Jacques Rousseau
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Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jean-Jacques Rousseau: Force is a physical power; I do not see how its effects could produce morality. Force is a physical power; I do not see how its effects could produce morality. To yield to force is an act of necessity, not of will; it is at best an act of prudence. In what sense can it be a moral duty? — Jean-Jacques Rousseau
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Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jean-Jacques Rousseau: The spectacle of nature, by growing quite familiar to him, becomes at last equally indifferent. The spectacle of nature, by growing quite familiar to him, becomes at last equally indifferent. It is constantly the same order, constantly the same revolutions; he has not sense enough to feel surprise at the sight of the greatest wonders; and it is not in his mind we must look for that philosophy, which man must have to know how to observe once, what he has every day seen. Jean Jacques Rousseau, On the Inequality among Mankind, Ch. 1, 20. — Jean-Jacques Rousseau
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Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jean-Jacques Rousseau: Everything is good as it comes from the hands of the Maker of the world, Everything is good as it comes from the hands of the Maker of the world, but degenerates once it gets into the hands of man — Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jean-Jacques Rousseau: It is difficult for an education in which the heart is involved to remain forever It is difficult for an education in which the heart is involved to remain forever lost. — Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jean-Jacques Rousseau: An intelligent being, is the active principle of all things. One must have renounced all An intelligent being, is the active principle of all things. One must have renounced all common sense to doubt it, and it is a waste of time to try to prove such self evident truth. — Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jean-Jacques Rousseau: I will simply ask: What is philosophy? What do the writings of the best known I will simply ask: What is philosophy? What do the
writings of the best known philosophers contain? What are the
lessons of these friends of wisdom? To listen to them, would
one not take them for a troupe of charlatans crying out in a
public square, each from his own corner: "Come to me. I'm the
only one who is not wrong"? — Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jean-Jacques Rousseau: In fact, the real source of all those differences, is that the savage lives within In fact, the real source of all those differences, is that the savage lives within himself, whereas the citizen, constantly beside himself, knows only how to live in the opinion of others; insomuch that it is, if I may say so, merely from their judgment that he derives the consciousness of his own existence. — Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jean-Jacques Rousseau: Government in its infancy had no regular and permanent form. For want of a sufficient Government in its infancy had no regular and permanent form. For want of a sufficient fund of philosophy and experience, men could see no further than the present inconveniences, and never thought of providing remedies for future ones, but in proportion as they arose. — Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jean-Jacques Rousseau: To live is not to breathe but to act. It is to make use of To live is not to breathe but to act. It is to make use of our organs, our senses, our faculties, of all the parts of ourselves which give us the sentiment of our existence. The man who has lived the most is not he who has counted the most years but he who has most felt life. — Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jean-Jacques Rousseau: I also realized that the philosophers, far from ridding me of my vain doubts, only I also realized that the philosophers, far from ridding me of my vain doubts, only multiplied the doubts that tormented me and failed to remove any one of them. So I chose another guide and said, Let me follow the Inner Light; it will not lead me so far astray as others have done, or if it does it will be my own fault, and I shall not go so far wrong if I follow my own illusions as if I trusted to their deceits. — Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jean-Jacques Rousseau: Political writers argue in regard to the love of liberty with the same philosophy that Political writers argue in regard to the love of liberty with the same philosophy that philosophers do in regard to the state of nature; by the things they see they judge of things very different which they have never seen, and they attribute to men a natural inclination to slavery, on account of the patience with which the slaves within their notice carry the yoke; not reflecting that it is with liberty as with innocence and virtue, the value of which is not known but by those who possess them, though the relish for them is lost with the things themselves. I know the charms of your country, said Brasidas to a satrap who was comparing the life of the Spartans with that of the Persepolites; but you can not know the pleasures of mine. — Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jean-Jacques Rousseau: What conclusion is to be drawn from this paradox so worthy of being born in What conclusion is to be drawn from this paradox so worthy of being born in our time; and what will become of virtue when one has to get rich at all cost?
The ancient political thinkers forever spoke of morals and of virtue; ours speak only of commerce and money. — Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jean-Jacques Rousseau: It is too difficult to think nobly when one thinks only of earning a living. It is too difficult to think nobly when one thinks only of earning a living. — Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jean-Jacques Rousseau: The good man can be proud of his virtue because it is his. But of The good man can be proud of his virtue because it is his. But of what is the intelligent man proud? — Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jean-Jacques Rousseau: We cannot teach children the danger of lying to men without feeling as men, the We cannot teach children the danger of lying to men without feeling as men, the greater danger of lying to children. — Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jean-Jacques Rousseau: Are your principles not engraved in all hearts, and in order to learn your laws Are your principles not engraved in all hearts, and in order to learn your laws is it not enough to go back into oneself and listen to the voice of one's conscience in the silence of the passions? There you have true philosophy. Let us learn to be satisfied with that, and without envying the glory of those famous men who are immortalized in the republic of letters, let us try to set between them and us that glorious distinction which people made long ago between two great peoples: one knew how to speak well; the other how to act well. — Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jacques-Louis David: The artist must be a philosopher. Socrates the skilled sculptor, Jean-Jacques [Rousseau] the good musician, The artist must be a philosopher. Socrates the skilled sculptor, Jean-Jacques [Rousseau] the good musician, and the immortal Poussin, tracing on the canvas the sublime lessons of philosophy, are so many proofs that an artistic genius should have no other guide except the torch of reason. — Jacques-Louis David
Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jean-Jacques Rousseau: An animal, at the end of a few months, is what it will be all An animal, at the end of a few months, is what it will be all its life; and its species, at the end of a thousand years, is what it was in the first of those thousand years. Why is man alone subject to becoming an imbecile? — Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Jean Jacques Rousseau Philosophy Sayings By Jean-Jacques Rousseau: I can discover nothing in any mere animal but an ingenious machine, to which nature I can discover nothing in any mere animal but an ingenious machine, to which nature has given senses to wind itself up, and guard, to a certain degree, against everything that might destroy or disorder it. — Jean-Jacques Rousseau