Peggotty's Famous Quotes & Sayings

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google+ Pinterest Share on Linkedin

11 Peggotty's Famous Sayings, Quotes and Quotation.

Peggotty's Sayings By Charles Dickens: We strolled a long way, and loaded ourselves with things that we thought curious, and We strolled a long way, and loaded ourselves with things that we thought curious, and put some stranded starfish carefully back into the water - I hardly know enough of the race at this moment to be quite certain whether they had reason to feel obliged to us for doing so, or the reverse - and then made our way home to Mr. Peggotty's dwelling. — Charles Dickens
More Pictures »
Peggotty's Sayings By Charles Dickens: My rescue from this kind of existence I considered quite hopeless, and abandoned, as such, My rescue from this kind of existence I considered quite hopeless, and abandoned, as such, altogether. I am solemnly convinced that I never for one hour was reconciled to it, or was otherwise than miserably unhappy; but I bore it; and even to Peggotty, partly for the love of her and partly for shame, never in any letter (though many passed between us) revealed the truth. Mr. Micawber's difficulties were an addition to the — Charles Dickens
More Pictures »
Peggotty's Sayings By Charles Dickens: Oh, it's not her Christian name. Her Christian name is Clara.' 'Is it though?' said Oh, it's not her Christian name. Her Christian name is Clara.' 'Is it though?' said Mr. Barkis. He seemed to find an immense fund of reflection in this circumstance, and sat pondering and inwardly whistling for some time. 'Well!' he resumed at length. 'Says you, "Peggotty! Barkis is waitin' for a answer." Says she, perhaps, "Answer to what?" Says you, "To what I told you." "What is that?" says she. "Barkis is willin'," says you.' This extremely artful suggestion Mr. Barkis accompanied with a nudge of his elbow that gave me quite a stitch in my — Charles Dickens
More Pictures »
Peggotty's Sayings By Charles Dickens: I don't know how it is,' said Peggotty, 'unless it's on account of being stupid, I don't know how it is,' said Peggotty, 'unless it's on account of being stupid, but my head never can pick and choose its people. They come and they go, and they don't come and they don't go, just as they like. I wonder what's become of her? — Charles Dickens
Peggotty's Sayings By Charles Dickens: "People can't die, along the coast," said Mr. Peggotty, "except when the tide's pretty nigh "People can't die, along the coast," said Mr. Peggotty, "except when the tide's pretty nigh out. They can't be born, unless it's pretty nigh in - not properly born, till flood. He's a going out with the tide. It's ebb at half-arter three, slack water half an hour. If he lives till it turns, he'll hold his own till past the flood, and go out with the next tide." — Charles Dickens
Peggotty's Sayings By Charles Dickens: Peggotty and I were sitting one night by the parlour fire, alone. I had been Peggotty and I were sitting one night by the parlour fire, alone. I had been reading to Peggotty about crocodiles. I must have read very perspicuously, or the poor soul must have been deeply interested, for I remember she had a cloudy impression, after I had done, that they were a sort of vegetable. I — Charles Dickens
Peggotty's Sayings By Charles Dickens: Though there was nothing very airy about Miss Murdstone, she was a perfect Lark in Though there was nothing very airy about Miss Murdstone, she was a perfect Lark in point of getting up. She was up (and, as I believe to this hour, looking for that man) before anybody in the house was stirring. Peggotty gave it as her opinion that she even slept with one eye open; but I could not concur in this idea; for I tried it myself after hearing the suggestion thrown out, and found it couldn't be done. — Charles Dickens
Peggotty's Sayings By Charles Dickens: "Peggotty!" repeated Miss Betsey, with some indignation. "Do you mean to say, child, that any "Peggotty!" repeated Miss Betsey, with some indignation. "Do you mean to say, child, that any human being has gone into a Christian church, and got herself named Peggotty?" — Charles Dickens
Peggotty's Sayings By Charles Dickens: The only subject ... on which he (Mr. Peggotty - M. Zh.) ever showed a The only subject ... on which he (Mr. Peggotty - M. Zh.) ever showed a violent temper or swore an oath, was this generosity of his; and if it were ever referred to ... he struck the table a heavy blow with his right hand (had split it on one such occasion), and swore a dreadful oath that he would be "Gormed" if he didn't cut and run for good, if it was ever mentioned again. It appeared ... that nobody had the least idea of the etymology of this terrible verb passive to be gormed; but that they all regarded it constituting a most solemn imprecation." (Chapter III) — Charles Dickens
Peggotty's Sayings By Charles Dickens: Peggotty always went to sleep with her chin upon the handle of the basket, her Peggotty always went to sleep with her chin upon the handle of the basket, her hold of which never relaxed; and I could not have believed unless I had heard her do it, that one defenceless woman could have snored so much. — Charles Dickens
Peggotty's Sayings By Charles Dickens: Every night,' said Mr. Peggotty, 'as reg'lar as the night comes, the candle must be Every night,' said Mr. Peggotty, 'as reg'lar as the night comes, the candle must be stood in its old pane of glass, that if ever she should see it, it may seem to say, Come back, my child, come back! — Charles Dickens