Top Novelist Famous Quotes & Sayings

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4 Top Novelist Famous Sayings, Quotes and Quotation.

Top Novelist Sayings By Zelda Popkin: You do not conceive a novel as easily as you conceive a child, nor even You do not conceive a novel as easily as you conceive a child, nor even half as easily as you create nonfiction work. A journalist amasses facts, anecdotes and interviews with top brass. Enough of these add up to a book. A novelist demands quite different things. He has to find himself in his materials, to know for sure how he would feel and act and the events he writes about. In addition, he requires a catalyst - a person, idea, or emotion which coalesces his ingredients and makes them jell into a solid purpose. — Zelda Popkin
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Top Novelist Sayings By Martin Cruz Smith: To capture the human cost of fallen empire with all its horror and absurdity, Sheets To capture the human cost of fallen empire with all its horror and absurdity, Sheets offers the right combination: the political insight of a top reporter and the power of a novelist. — Martin Cruz Smith
Top Novelist Sayings By Richard Ford: (My greatest human flaw and strength, not surprisingly, is that I can always imagine anythinga (My greatest human flaw and strength, not surprisingly, is that I can always imagine anything
a marriage, a conversation, a government
as being different from how it is, a trait that might make one a top-notch trial lawyer or novelist or realtor, but that also seems to produce a somewhat less than reliable and morally feasible human being.) — Richard Ford
Top Novelist Sayings By Allan Massie: Today the crime novelist has one advantage denied to writers of 'straight' or 'literary' novels. Today the crime novelist has one advantage denied to writers of 'straight' or 'literary' novels. Unlike them he can range over all levels of society, for crime can easily breach the barriers that exist in our stratified society. Because of these barriers the modern literary novel, unlike its 19th-century predecessors, is often confined to the horizontal, dealing only with one class. But crime runs through society from top to bottom, and so the crime novelist can present a fuller picture of the way we live now. — Allan Massie