Ugandan Famous Quotes & Sayings

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8 Ugandan Famous Sayings, Quotes and Quotation.

Ugandan Sayings By Roger Ross Williams: They embrace them because they represent everything that America represents: money, power, and freedom. Why They embrace them because they represent everything that America represents: money, power, and freedom. Why else would you see an old Ugandan woman respectfully listen to a 22-year-old white girl from America telling her what she should or shouldn't believe? — Roger Ross Williams
Ugandan Sayings By Forest Whitaker: As an artist, it's a great opportunity to play a character like this [Ugandan dictator As an artist, it's a great opportunity to play a character like this [Ugandan dictator Idi Amin in The Last King of Scotland]. And then, as a person, I had never been to the African continent. So, I knew, personally, it would reshape me. — Forest Whitaker
Ugandan Sayings By Forest Whitaker: Trying to understand, inside, what it is to be Ugandan was crucial to the character, Trying to understand, inside, what it is to be Ugandan was crucial to the character, because there are Ugandan ways of doing things that I was trying to capture. Even if I had made this movie in South Africa, it would not have been the same, because it is so specific to Uganda. — Forest Whitaker
Ugandan Sayings By Ryszard Kapuscinski: I remember in 1978 meeting two Ugandan captains in the hotel talking Russian. They had I remember in 1978 meeting two Ugandan captains in the hotel talking Russian. They had been educated in Moscow and since they came from different Ugandan peoples, it was the only way they could understand one another. — Ryszard Kapuscinski
Ugandan Sayings By Forest Whitaker: I found the people to be very kind and generous. It was unique because the I found the people to be very kind and generous. It was unique because the crew was mainly Ugandan [filming The Last King of Scotland]. They had never done a film before. So, they were learning the process of making films, but at the same time they were also helping with the authenticity of the film. — Forest Whitaker
Ugandan Sayings By Fisher Amelie: Sorry," I said, realizing I was taking my frustrations out on her. "I'm still getting Sorry," I said, realizing I was taking my frustrations out on her. "I'm still getting over Soph," I said, referring to my old prep school friend.
Sophie Price was the most beautiful girl you'd ever met. Seriously. Take it from someone who's met Bar Refaeli in person. Soph was even more stunning. Especially since she'd had a personality makeover. I'd never regret anything as much as I would not making her fall in love with me.
"You can't make anyone fall, Spence. Either they do or they don't."
"I said that out loud?"
"Duh and it's been two years, Spencer. You seriously need to get over her. She's with that Ian guy anyway, right?"
"Right."
"That hot South African guy named Ian," she concluded.
"Thanks."
"That hot saffy named Ian who gives his life to mutilated Ugandan orphans and worships the ground Sophie walks on."
I stopped and glared at her. "That'll do, Bridge. — Fisher Amelie
Ugandan Sayings By Nick Hahn: In Ugandan society a girl who had reached puberty was eligible for a family-arranged marriage. In Ugandan society a girl who had reached puberty was eligible for a family-arranged marriage. The groom would bring wealth to the bride's family in the form of cattle, goats, or land. My experience at the hands of Joseph Kony's murderers and rapists had made a mockery of this custom. I hated the idea, and my father understood. — Nick Hahn
Ugandan Sayings By Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: Laura picked up the menu again. "In graduate school I knew a woman from Africa Laura picked up the menu again. "In graduate school I knew a woman from Africa who was just like this doctor, I think she was from Uganda. She was wonderful, and she didn't get along with the African-American woman in our class at all. She didn't have all those issues." "Maybe when the African American's father was not allowed to vote because he was black, the Ugandan's father was running for parliament or studying at Oxford," Ifemelu said. Laura stared at her, made a mocking confused face. "Wait, did I miss something?" "I just think it's a simplistic comparison to make. You need to understand a bit more history," Ifemelu said. — Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie