Tony Leuzzi Famous Quotes & Sayings

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4 Tony Leuzzi Famous Sayings, Quotes and Quotation.

Tony Leuzzi Sayings: You have a poem called "Bad Theology." What would you call a bad theology?I guess You have a poem called "Bad Theology." What would you call a bad theology?
I guess any theology that presumes to have God in its pocket. Can I explain this without sinning further? We'll find out. The community in which I was raised did what they would call theology, but it was always a kind of cranky, brutal reduction of lush and beautiful complexities into the lowest common denominator, the dullest version. But when I went away to school and started reading more, I became increasingly dissatisfied with any theology that replaces the enormous, immeasurable real with very measurable and very calculated replacements. I'm not saying this very eloquently, but I guess bad theology articulates as definitive and conclusive that which is unknowable and without end.
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Tony Leuzzi Sayings: [I]f we could imagine a world without slavery and abolish that institution, then we can [I]f we could imagine a world without slavery and abolish that institution, then we can face the troubles we have now ... Who was it that imagined a world where the Nazis could be defeated?There were those who looked upon that war machine and said: this can and must be destroyed.That resistance ... began with an act of the imagination. Resistance begins with the imagination.
Tony Leuzzi Sayings: [A]rt can't ever be programmatic ... it needs on the contrary to be complicating, subtle, [A]rt can't ever be programmatic ... it needs on the contrary to be complicating, subtle, questioning, doubtful and doubting.
Tony Leuzzi Sayings: Robert Frost didn't like to explain his poems - and for good reason: to explain Robert Frost didn't like to explain his poems - and for good reason: to explain a poem is to suck the air from its lungs. This does not mean, however, that poets shouldn't talk about their poetry, or that one shouldn't ask questions about it. Rather, it suggests that any discussion of poetry should celebrate its ultimate ineffability and in so doing lead one to further inquiry. I think of that wonderful scene from Elie Wiesel's memoir, Night, where Mosche the Beadle of the local synagogue, in dialogue with the young, precocious author, explains: Every question possesses a power that does not lie in the answer.